Best NIC for PfSense?



  • Hi,
    I've used Pfsense 1.2.3 for 4-5 years without problems… few months ago I've installed 2.2.x version on a machine with 4 Realtek NIC, but seems have some problems: about once a day one nic (random) stops working and I have to shutdown the server (ifdown/ifup doesn't take effects).

    I'm trying IC+ nic (stge driver) but this have other problem: after few hour of inactivity (eg in the night) stops working... dhcpd.log reports:

    dhcpd: send_packet: No buffer space available
    dhcpd: dhcp.c:3971: Failed to send 300 byte long packet over stge0 interface

    I tried also a dual NIC HP NC360T (based on Intel 82571EB chipset: supported by FreeBSD 10.3), both with default and new driver (7.6.2) results are the same: on reboot PfSense doesn't recognize NIC, and I have to shutdown and restart...

    So, this is my question: which is the most reliable NIC for PfSense?

    Thanks

    Antonio


  • Banned

    Have you tried plain Intel cards (no OEM)?



  • Also a +1 on the Intel cards, I actually make it a rule for anyone who wants to set up a box that no matter what other parts go in it's an intel chip nic, (be it HP/ DELL / Hotlava branded etc) because the drivers are rock solid and they give great performance without the weirdness you sometimes get with other cards.



  • @CC:

    Also a +1 on the Intel cards, I actually make it a rule for anyone who wants to set up a box that no matter what other parts go in it's an intel chip nic, (be it HP/ DELL / Hotlava branded etc) because the drivers are rock solid and they give great performance without the weirdness you sometimes get with other cards.

    It almost seems like you didn't read the original post.

    The intel nic fetish is a bit over the top here–they simply aren't the only manufacturer who can produce a simple nic. Given that 3 different chipsets failed, I'd begin to suspect a problem with the system itself; one wonky capacitor can make the whole thing flake out.


  • Banned

    Realtek is unfixable junk. As for various OEM spin-offs of Intel, the trouble is that the OEM often screw up the whole thing with their "improvements" (or are outright crippling the NICs when compared to the non-OEM variant with the same chipset).



  • @doktornotor:

    Realtek is unfixable junk.

    Except for the fact that for non-fanboys they work fine. Yeah, it's possible that every single nic that he tried was just junk that doesn't meet your high standards, but I'd still suspect the thing they're getting plugged into. The constant anti-rtl drumbeat on this board defies the reality that there are tens of millions of the things deployed and working fine, without mysterious disconnects or other phantoms that people here would argue are absolutely inevitable due to the fundamentally non-working nature of every chipset realtek has ever produced. (And any problem with an intel nic is quickly explained away.)


  • Banned

    Yup. They work great. Ask the PC Engines guy what they think about Realtek.



  • @VAMike:

    It almost seems like you didn't read the original post.

    The intel nic fetish is a bit over the top here–they simply aren't the only manufacturer who can produce a simple nic. Given that 3 different chipsets failed, I'd begin to suspect a problem with the system itself; one wonky capacitor can make the whole thing flake out.

    Read it but the OP was asking on what people thought would be the best NIC, now many people may have a lot of luck with a verity of network cards from whatever vendor they may choose from but having several PFsense boxes in work production as well as mine at home (and my goto recommendation for friends who want to roll one out) is stick with Intel chipsets.

    So yeah while the original post kind of meanders into troubleshooting a bit, I did reply to the topic subject " Best NIC for PfSense?" ;)



  • @CC:

    So yeah while the original post kind of meanders into troubleshooting a bit, I did reply to the topic subject " Best NIC for PfSense?" ;)

    The original poster already tried an intel chipset, and you just told him to try an intel chipset. If you want to speak to what NIC is most reliable then I guess the advice should speak to the prevalence of counterfeit parts and the importance of making sure that you're sourcing quality parts, and then name a specific nic. A grey market intel nic with dodgy components isn't any better than a cut-rate realtek with dodgy components. (Except that on this board you might get castigated for getting the too-cheap intel nic off ebay, but the too-cheap realtek will be written off as "all realteks are the same and none of them can possibly work".) So if the goal is to buy one more nic to see if that's the problem the advice would be to buy an i350-T2 at full retail from a reliable supplier. It should run about $140. If that one flakes out also, it's the system not the nics.


  • Banned

    So, which part of plain Intel (no OEM) is unclear? And yeah, there's no "grey market" with Realtek NICs, because noone wants to fake something that's already a complete crap from the very beginning.



  • @doktornotor:

    Yup. They work great. Ask the PC Engines guy what they think about Realtek.

    Interestingly, the only NIC I've had unexplained flakiness with in the past several years is the i210 in the apu2. I suspect maybe something they missed in the initialization in the firmware because their firmware support has been generally lousy. I never had any problems with the rtls in the apu1 (except that I think they never did release a firmware fix to get the speed indicator lights working usefully), or with i2xxs on other platforms. I'd also suspect it was worth it to them to spend an extra couple of bucks on intel chips just to stop all the whining they got from fanboys about the realteks.


  • Banned

    Definitely. All those complaints about Realtek were from Intel fanboys, while actually there was no real problem with them, whatsoever… The OP having the NICs die on him on a daily basis is also a perfect reason to recommend Realtek as the best option.

    Out of this retarded debate.

    ::) ::) ::)



  • @doktornotor:

    Definitely. All those complaints about Realtek were from Intel fanboys, while actually there was no real problem with them, whatsoever… The OP having the NICs die on him on a daily basis is also a perfect reason to recommend Realtek as the best option.

    It's almost as though the OP didn't write that 2 of the 3 chipsets he was having problems with were not realtek. (Or maybe fanboys have selective reading comprehension?)


  • Banned

    I have no idea about stge. And I have already commented on the non-OEM multiple times, but people pushing Realtek junk clearly have selecting understanding. The card not getting properly recognized/initialized on a warm reboot would clearly suggest shitty firmware coming from the OEM. But then again, the option will obviously be Realtek. If the OP puts say 16 of them in there, leaving most of them unused, chances are that only the unused ones will actually die on him, so it should minimize the forced reboots.



  • @doktornotor:

    I have no idea about stge.

    Clearly.

    The card not getting properly recognized/initialized on a warm reboot would clearly suggest shitty firmware coming from the OEM.

    Or a flaky pcie bus, which would also explain random hangs at runtime with three different chipsets. But I understand that anything that implies that spending enough money on the right intel nic isn't a magical solution to any problem or that any other kind of nic might actually work must be suspect.


  • Banned

    Yep. Every thread asking about recommended NICs should be closed with "Buy Realtek".



  • @doktornotor:

    Yep. Every thread asking about recommended NICs should be closed with "Buy Realtek".

    You've certainly proven my point about there being a weird, irrational, monomaniacal phobia about a particular manufacturer's products running through this board. What's really interesting is that I never even suggested buying another realtek, I just pointed out that there are other things to look at than the nic. Sorry if that caused brain hurt.


  • Banned

    And now for something completely different.

    So, this is my question: which is the most reliable NIC for PfSense?

    Oh wait, that was the original question, before the Realtek squad took over the thread.  ::)



  • @VAMike:

    Or a flaky pcie bus, which would also explain random hangs at runtime with three different chipsets. But I understand that anything that implies that spending enough money on the right intel nic isn't a magical solution to any problem or that any other kind of nic might actually work must be suspect.

    Fair comment; the OP (who's thread has been hijecked at this point) might have something else up that's manifesting as network problems (I've even seen switches be the root cause in the past) but while there are other vendors out there who's mileage may vary, given the maturity of the drivers (one of BSD's weaker points), and the stability of the hardware at this point it's difficult to NOT recommend the intel cards when someone asks. (and they are typically cited as the goto on unraid forums (unraid runs on nanobsd))



  • This is the kind of thing that makes me go nuts on this forum.

    People come in here and want to get attention with their problems at the most basic level.
    (excluding netgate products of course)

    If you didn't do your troubleshooting to get all the way to "oh it must be software" why are you even asking in here?

    DO the work first instead of wasting the time of people.  Oh and even pissing off some of us in the process.

    "What is the best nic for pfsense" is clearly answered in the GD book.

    Yeah we assume stuff on this board.  We assumed you are competent enough to do your own troubleshooting if you're building your own systems.  We assume you've established that your problem is with pfsense through troubleshooting otherwise you'd be on another vendor's board posting shit.

    All of a sudden there's blowback because there's some Realtek fans in the house and don't like that the forumers routinely bash them.
    This must be hell, the same week people are defending Realtek and Leslie Jones is pushing to be in Deadpool 2.  Man wtf is going on?  Realtek's ethernet devices have been a scourge for however long. They have a crab logo for cryin out loud. A CRAB.



  • realtek is poor on FreeBSD (which is what pfsense uses).

    I recommend on realtek nic's to disable offloading which should make them stable but they still wont scale as well to higher loads as intel cards, since intel has tunable interrupt moderation etc.

    The realtek issues are bad enough in that I invested around £50 in a mini pcie addon card for my NUC so I could get 2 intel ports.



  • Realtek sucks, their so called "gigabit" nics can barely reach half that with twice as much cpu usage as an intel nic doing actual 1gbps.
    I hate intel for a variety of reasons but they make way better nics than realtek, although they aren't the only game in town.

    Anyone who hasn't ever heard of more nic oem's than realtek and intel is simply clueless, off the top of my head mellanox, cavium, solarflare - to name a few but Intel is AFAIK the only company that has widely available modern 1gbps ethernet cards whereas for 10gbps there is the above, mellanox connectx2 can be had for only $10-30 for instance which is a great deal for 10gbe)

    Intel i350 (best modern chipset):
    You can get a 4 port whitebox reference design (made with a real intel ASIC) for around $50 on fleabay.
    The "OEM" unbranded whitebox ones are fine, I have had mine for over a year and it works just as good as the real thing there isn't any reason to spend five times as much if you're using this at home and not a business mission critical environment.
    Keep in mind the genuine one is made in china too.

    I am a paranoid person but I do not think there is a backdoor, people buying these aren't sticking them in anything important so it isn't worth spending millions to do this and not simply do it to the intel fab itself vs just some gray market ebay shit.

    It supports SR-IOV with flexi-ports, whereas the older generation such as gigabit ET series you couldn't assign a single port to a VM you had to do two at a time.

    Intel Gigabit ET (older):
    Server pulls around $10 for dual port on ebay, sr-iov that doesn't have flexi-port partitioning.

    Intel PRO/1000PT (very old):
    No virtualization, but you can get a 6 port silicom for $10 on ebay.



  • @Taiidan:

    Realtek sucks, their so called "gigabit" nics can barely reach half that with twice as much cpu usage as an intel nic doing actual 1gbps.

    curl foo/testfil > /dev/null
      % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed  Time    Time    Time  Current
                                    Dload  Upload  Total  Spent    Left  Speed
    100 1024M  100 1024M    0    0  111M      0  0:00:09  0:00:09 –:--:--  111M
    curl foo-jumbo/testfil > /dev/null
      % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed  Time    Time    Time  Current
                                    Dload  Upload  Total  Spent    Left  Speed
    100 1024M  100 1024M    0    0  117M      0  0:00:08  0:00:08 --:--:--  117M

    That's an 8111G, so your statement is demonstrably false. You wanna argue the i350 is a better nic than an 8111G I won't dispute that, but let's at least keep the criticism grounded in reality.

    Intel i350 (best modern chipset):
    You can get a 4 port whitebox reference design (made with a real intel ASIC) for around $50 on fleabay.
    The "OEM" unbranded whitebox ones are fine, I have had mine for over a year and it works just as good as the real thing there isn't any reason to spend five times as much if you're using this at home and not a business mission critical environment.
    Keep in mind the genuine one is made in china too.

    The problem isn't the chip in the middle of the board, it's the components surrounding that chip. Chinese factories will produce what they're paid to produce. A legit vendor will pay for high-spec components and QC testing (and will test random samples themselves and reject orders which don't meet spec). A vendor hitting a $50 price point on ebay is using low spec components and skipping the QC. That doesn't mean that the $50 NIC is guaranteed to fail, but it does mean that the chance of it flaking out under load is a heck of a lot higher than the part built from high spec components. If you're buying just one and the failure rate is still something like 1 in 1000 your odds of getting something broken are still pretty low–but anyone doing this should be aware of what they're getting. (And that 1 in 1000 number is completely made up; anecdotally there are batches where the failure rates are a heck of a lot higher than that, and the thing about no-name ebay sellers is that there's no way to figure out what batch your part is coming from or what the real failure rate is.) That said, if you get a bad one you can throw it out and buy another and still come out ahead over buying one from a legit source, as long as your time isn't worth anything and/or you know this can happen and don't waste a lot of time trying to figure out what's wrong.



  • On my GB board are the Realtek 8111G also.

    I`m in a home environment and can confirm that they work fine.
    950 Mbps + overhead = 1 Gbps, no problem for this Realtek and no sweat for CPU…


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    With similar failures on realtek, stge, and em it is probably time to start considering something other than your NIC choice as the source of your problems.



  • @VAMike:

    @Taiidan:

    Realtek sucks, their so called "gigabit" nics can barely reach half that with twice as much cpu usage as an intel nic doing actual 1gbps.

    curl foo/testfil > /dev/null
      % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed  Time    Time    Time  Current
                                    Dload  Upload  Total  Spent    Left  Speed
    100 1024M  100 1024M    0    0  111M      0  0:00:09  0:00:09 –:--:--  111M
    curl foo-jumbo/testfil > /dev/null
      % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed  Time    Time    Time  Current
                                    Dload  Upload  Total  Spent    Left  Speed
    100 1024M  100 1024M    0    0  117M      0  0:00:08  0:00:08 --:--:--  117M

    That's an 8111G, so your statement is demonstrably false. You wanna argue the i350 is a better nic than an 8111G I won't dispute that, but let's at least keep the criticism grounded in reality.

    Yeah let's just go with reliable consistency.  Realtek and its kind are not consistent enough performers in a myriad of contexts to facilitate a 1st class networking experience via pfsense.  There are always outliers but the statistics are there.  And even if you get an A#1 part, the chips drivers are still considered to be underdeveloped in BSD.



  • @W4RH34D:

    Yeah let's just go with reliable consistency.  Realtek and its kind are not consistent enough performers in a myriad of contexts to facilitate a 1st class networking experience via pfsense.  There are always outliers but the statistics are there.  And even if you get an A#1 part, the chips drivers are still considered to be underdeveloped in BSD.

    I won't even agree with the consistency thing, there's enough data out there showing they work fine. There are definitely issues with cut rate ebay boards that have historically used rtl as the cheapest option, but IME those are problems with the component integration, not the rtl part. It's exactly the same kind of issues of dodgy VRs and capacitors that plague ebay intel nics, and I can pretty much guarantee now that intel is embedding i200s in almost everything you'll start to see cut rate ebay motherboards with flaky onboard networks that happen to use intel drivers–because so much of this has nothing to do with the networking silicon itself.

    I will agree that the bsd re(4) driver has been terrible (though it's getting better), but if that's the beef people should just say that rather than making ludicrous claims that every product made by a major manufacturer doesn't actually work.



  • I have an Intel i350-T2 running with baremetal PFSense Haswell i5-3.2ghz and it's freaking wonderful.

    TCP iperf 1500mtu
    client1-PFSense(NAT, HFSC traffic shaping to 1Gb, 2 streams both ways)-client2(internal to network)
    1.95Gb/s @ 12% CPU

    UDP iperf 64mtu
    client1-PFSense(NAT, HFSC traffic shaping to 1Gb, 4 streams one way)-client2(external to network)
    1Gb/s @ 17% CPU; PFSense claimed nearly 1Gb/s egress on the WAN, so I assume loss was low. Due to the nature of client2 being outside the network, my internet connection is rate limited well below 1Gb. I would have done an internal test, but Win10 still doesn't work with VLANs. But that's line rate NATing+Shaping.


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    All of my problems receiving DHCP from upstream went away when I swapped out a realtek jetway PCI daughter card for intel. Just sayin. Put it through a switch first so I could capture. ISP was doing the right thing. Card would just "go deaf" out-of-the-blue occasionally.

    There are known issues with some realtek chips/drivers not properly implementing things like hard-setting speed/duplex in the edge cases where that's required.

    PC Engines didn't switch to intel for APU2 for zero reason.

    ESXi pulled support for realtek chips a while back.

    Much anecdotal evidence supports avoiding realtek.



  • @Derelict:

    All of my problems receiving DHCP from upstream went away when I swapped out a realtek jetway PCI daughter card for intel. Just sayin. Put it through a switch first so I could capture. ISP was doing the right thing. Card would just "go deaf" out-of-the-blue occasionally.

    There are known issues with some realtek chips/drivers not properly implementing things like hard-setting speed/duplex in the edge cases where that's required.

    PC Engines didn't switch to intel for APU2 for zero reason.

    ESXi pulled support for realtek chips a while back.

    Much anecdotal evidence supports avoiding realtek.

    Yeah, the whole system seems to be brought down by this stuff - whether thats some sort of bad voltages or timings or what is not something I have the capability of investigating.  The simple matter is with the recommended hardware, the software behaves as expected.

    I thought it was fine - when I had a few realtek chips as well.  Then I put in the intel stuff and the little wonkiness I had experienced stopped.  Everything worked there wasn't an "oh shit I pressed this and now im hosed" type things.  The VPN comes right back up on setting change etc.



  • @radarino

    I've used Pfsense 1.2.3 for 4-5 years without problems… few months ago I've installed 2.2.x version on a machine with 4 Realtek NIC, but seems have some problems: about once a day one nic (random) stops working and I have to shutdown the server (ifdown/ifup doesn't take effects).

    What kind of hardware is this? 32Bit or 64Bit? And this is a 32Bit or 64Bit pfSense installation?
    If this will be 64Bit capable hardware I would suggesting to install also a 64Bit pfSense version too!

    @doktornotor

    So, this is my question: which is the most reliable NIC for PfSense?

    Not so easy to answer at this moment as I see it right here but watched under different circumstances it might be better to understanding.
    (Only my version about it)

    • You have a running pfSense installation and all went fine for you, this might be sounding strange but if so and all
      things you need or whish to do can be realized easily there is nothing to talk about the brand or manufacturer name
      of the NICs. If QoS, VLANs, bridging and all other things went fine, you may not need to dicuss the vendor name of
      the NIC producer in any kind or manner. Because all is fine running.

    • If you gots trouble and/or problems that can´t be solved you will be better with an actual and good driver supported
      NIC, better then the problem causing one. At this time it might be a good choice to have a look onto Intel NICs that are
      actually also fine running under the actual pfSense hardware and/or that will be used by pfSense (store) appliances it self
      or perhaps they will be really good reported as running fine without any hassle or issues. Perhaps likes;

    • Intel Pro/1000 PT dual or quad port NICs

    • Intel i210 single or dual port NICs

    • Intel i340-T2 or T4 adapters

    • Intel i350-T2 or T4 adapters

    • Intel X520 or X540 NICs

    • Chelsio T520 orT540 NICs

    They are causing mostly no problems and/or are very well driver supported and widely reported well working too!

    • Before setting up or buying hardware it might be also nice to know which hardware especially which NICs are well
      working and doing their job in all kinds of disciplines well. So it might be good to know before spending money that
      there will be no money wasted for a NIC. For two refurbished Intel PT ones we talk about nearly ~$100 that is quite
      much money for the most if us.

    950 Mbps + overhead = 1 Gbps, no problem for this Realtek and no sweat for CPU…

    Also Broadcom will be running fine in much systems, and if there will be not a problem or a thing that
    can not be done or realized there will be no need to change it, but if something went wrong and can´t
    solved out, it might be better to go with an Intel card where no problems will be reported at any time,
    and not before. So if all is running fine the brand is absolutely not interesting in my eyes.

    All of my problems receiving DHCP from upstream went away when I swapped out a realtek jetway PCI daughter card for intel. Just sayin. Put it through a switch first so I could capture. ISP was doing the right thing. Card would just "go deaf" out-of-the-blue occasionally.

    There are known issues with some realtek chips/drivers not properly implementing things like hard-setting speed/duplex in the edge cases where that's required.

    You are the lucky one, because that will be mostly based on the PHY that is soldered on this daughter boards. For the NF9HG-2930
    I often advice here in the forum, are also two daughter boards are available and the both comes with a Pericom PHY soldered on the
    boards that is not really supported by pfSense and so it may be also going on with your RealTek daughter board perhaps!?

    Much anecdotal evidence supports avoiding realtek.

    In former days it was really not the best bet or option to go with a RealTek NIC based on other things but based on the slower
    WAN or Internet connections it was not really important. As todays WAN or Internet connections speed will be fast increasing
    it might be becoming more important for users to get a good driver supported NIC for that action (WAN).

    In earlier days RealTek was fully offloading any network tasks to the system CPUs, but for low power and/or smaller appliances
    this was a really horror, but based on the lower Internet connection speed this was acceptable for the most users.

    Intel was soldering a small network chip that was handling the parities only (consumer cards (NICs)) on his cards and so they
    was higher in price compared against the mostly other vendors network cards, but they where offloading "some" tasks from
    the system CPU and so this systems was acting more agile. But again also for a small but higher price or budget to pay for.

    At the server cards Intel was soldering DSPs (real digital signal processors) on the cards that might be able to fully offload or
    offloading many more tasks then the consumer based NICs, and so the systems will be more fast and agile then sorted with
    NICs from other vendors.

    I will agree that the bsd re(4) driver has been terrible (though it's getting better), but if that's the beef people should just say that rather than making ludicrous claims that every product made by a major manufacturer doesn't actually work.

    This might be also based on the interest from the vendor that is selling that hardware. If Intel is showing up FreeBSD
    drivers able to download from their website and RealTek is not really interested on doing this too, this might be not the
    problems from the driver writers from BSD, FreeBSD or pfSense.

    …...the chips drivers are still considered to be underdeveloped in BSD.

    But with a viewing eye toward to pfSense and remembering the starting post in that thread here, it might be also
    nice to wish what kind of system (hardware) and which pfSense version (32Bit or 64Bit) will be really in the game.
    Because in the near future, we will see only a 64Bit pfSense version and why then all this 32Bit hardware and NICs
    on 32Bit systems should be sorted with new drivers? If this will be sooner as we could imagine it becomes true I
    would say I can understand this point from the driver programmers.



  • @Taiidan said in Best NIC for PfSense?:

    personne paranoïaque, mais je ne pense pas qu’il existe une porte dérobée. Les gens qui achètent ces produits ne les conservent pas pour rien d’important. Il ne vaut donc pas la peine de dépenser des millions de dollars pour le faire et pas simplement de le faire à l’intel fab par rapport à quelques-uns seulement. marché gris ebay merde.
    Il prend en charge SR-IOV avec flexi-ports, alors que l’ancienne génération telle que la série gigabit ET ne permettait pas d’attribuer un seul port à une machine virtuelle que vous deviez faire deux à la fois.
    Intel Gigabit ET (ancien): le
    serveur prélève environ 10 USD pour le double port sur eBay, Sr-iov ne disposant pas de partitionnement Flexi-Port.
    Intel PRO / 1000PT (très ancien):

    Hi,

    What about the i350T4 counterfeit ? some person says that they are better than the genuine version...
    i350T4V2 exist, i dunno if counterfeit exist ? do you have information about this ?

    Man thanks.



  • @Elrick75 Here are a couple of articles on the i350 fakes.
    https://forums.servethehome.com/index.php?threads/comparison-intel-i350-t4-genuine-vs-fake.6917/
    https://www.servethehome.com/investigating-fake-intel-i350-network-adapters/
    I bought the IBM variant of the i340-T4 for about $20 on Ebay and is working great in a virtual environment.



  • @provels said in Best NIC for PfSense?:

    nte IBM du i340-T4 pour environ 20 dollars sur Ebay et fonctionne très bien dans un environnement virtuel.

    Thanks, i already know one of these two links but it doesn't answer to my question, no concrete example comparing an official v2 and a counterfeit v2 ;(


  • Netgate Administrator

    Hard to imagine anyone is claiming the fakes are better than the genuine version. 😕

    Steve



  • @stephenw10 I agree about this.

    **But how to make difference between genuine and counterfeit v2 ? does the difference are the same than v1 ?

    A workaround is maybe to purcahse 2x10G or 4x10G (copper) instead of 1G ? in this case, does it exist some psSense NIC compliant ?**


  • Netgate Administrator

    Most (if not all) Intel 10GbaseT NICs are compatible with FreeBSD and hence pfSense.

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/11.2R/hardware.html#ethernet

    Steve


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    "better" might just mean "cheaper"



  • FWIW, I've great experience using the following NIC chipsets/cards with pfSense:

    Intel i340-T4
    Intel i350-T4
    Intel i210
    Chelsio T520-SO-CR
    Chelsio T540-SO-CR

    Of that list I consider the i340 and T540 to be "sweet spots" -- one can find some great deals on the i340 out there. It's fairly modern and actually quite similarly spec'd to the i350 (which often still sells for a premium). The Chelsio T540 is one of the only quad SFP+ cards that I know of. For the price, I think it's a decent deal for 4 x 10Gbit ports.

    Hope this helps.



  • @tman222 Thanks for your return.
    Finally, i purchase :

    • Intel X550-T2,very difficult to find true genuine card, so much chinese clone, only one true available
      I chose this one because it's 10GBASE-T card (copper) not very expensive (to i350-T4), more recent, less power consumption than chelsio T520-BT.
      With 10GBASE-T, i will be sure that my 1G WAN connexion will not be limited by bandwidth
      It's only 2 port, but i don't need more, i have two other ethernet port internally on my Dell R230, it will be used for ADSL and 4G connexion reduncy, no question to ask with this poor traffic usage.
    • T540-CR, the only best card to have 4x SFP+ port with pfSense

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