Telegraf for ARM systems? (e.g. Netgate SG-3100).


  • Netgate Administrator

    I seem to recall suggesting that, or something similar, to our developers when we first saw this issue and it was dismissed as impractical due to the time it would require.
    But if you've got the device and the time then give it a whirl.

    Cross compiling is problem for the dependencies here. I believe GO will not compile using our current setup which is the root of the problem here.

    Steve



  • @stephenw10 Honestly this may be something that, if the community could help, may provide beneficial to everyone. I can go out and grab the source and compile it myself, but that doesn't really help the community as a whole unless everyone compiles it themselves.
    Sounds like there are a couple of us willing to throw our hats in the ring to help in some way with this.



  • I'd just like to add one more vote for getting Telegraf running on the SG-1100



  • Well, I upgraded my SG-1100 to 2.4.5 p1 and out of the blue Telegraf started working. I didn't even notice it at first until I was looking at my Grafana dashboard and saw more than one pfSense host reporting data. So not sure what changed with the p1 release, but that seems to have been the puzzle piece to getting this working.



  • This is interesting! I wonder if others are also working after the upgrade.



  • I experienced the same thing, Telegraf seems to work on my SG-1100 since the 2.4.5 p1 update.



  • is it back on the package manager? i cant seem to find it anymore, i also upgraded to p1



  • The SG-3100 is a different architecture than the SG-1100. Hence why telegraf is available for some (SG-1100) users and not the rest of. Note: the thread is about Telegraf on ARM devices including the SG-3100, my understanding is that Go complied cleanly on the SG-1100 so they can build for that. This leave those of us who paid for a beefier system from Netgate in a bind. If I'd have went with a cheaper Intel Potectli or Qotom, I'd have x86_64 architecture and the ability to run just about anything, while saving money. I can't see a reason to buy the SG-3100 going forward, Telegraf being just one example of how this architecture is a second-class citizen for Netgate.



  • I wouldn't say Netgate is to blame in this particular instance. The A57 in the SG-3100 is a newer, more advanced processor than the A9 that is in the SG-1100, so there's going to be some compiler challenges there.

    But more so, this whole ARM journey fundamentally is a FreeBSD problem of being way behind the bar in this area. Until using pfSense and FreeNAS, I wouldn't touch BSD or any variant with a 10 foot pole, and outside of these two uses I still won't as there's jsut too many quarks with it in my humble opinion.

    Anyway, Go is being distributed separately from anything Netgate has control over, so can't blame them for those shortcomings.

    Now with that, I have my little SG-1100 which does not impress me in the least, and I have my larger Protectcli device, the FW2 to be exact, and going forward I will stay with my instincts and not go with the ARM based platforms for running freeBSD on to avoid the quarks. I will continue to have my assortment of ARM based systems mind you, just running Linux instead.

    I do feel that the release of the ARM hardware for pfSense was a mistake on Netgate's part, it just created very bad feedback for them unfortunately without more support and maturity on the part of the freeBSD foundation.



  • @jlw52761 said in Telegraf for ARM systems? (e.g. Netgate SG-3100).:

    I wouldn't say Netgate is to blame in this particular instance. The A57 in the SG-3100 is a newer, more advanced processor than the A9 that is in the SG-1100, so there's going to be some compiler challenges there.

    But more so, this whole ARM journey fundamentally is a FreeBSD problem of being way behind the bar in this area. Until using pfSense and FreeNAS, I wouldn't touch BSD or any variant with a 10 foot pole, and outside of these two uses I still won't as there's jsut too many quarks with it in my humble opinion.

    Anyway, Go is being distributed separately from anything Netgate has control over, so can't blame them for those shortcomings.

    Now with that, I have my little SG-1100 which does not impress me in the least, and I have my larger Protectcli device, the FW2 to be exact, and going forward I will stay with my instincts and not go with the ARM based platforms for running freeBSD on to avoid the quarks. I will continue to have my assortment of ARM based systems mind you, just running Linux instead.

    I do feel that the release of the ARM hardware for pfSense was a mistake on Netgate's part, it just created very bad feedback for them unfortunately without more support and maturity on the part of the freeBSD foundation.

    The funny thing is... the package from github has worked on my sg3100 since being released. Even after updates.



  • Hi,

    Which package from Github is this please?

    How did you set it up?

    Thanks,
    Victor



  • +1 I'd love to know about how you got it working on your SG-3100. I'm guessing you mean this package from github? If anyone has any resources to share on this, please post here. I would love to have monitoring for the SG-3100 but it's not worth hours of tinkering for me.



  • @jlw52761 - Well, what you say would make sense, if any Netgate pages actually mentioned that the SG-3100 doesn't support all software, or was a bit more open about the limitations when pushing it.

    I love Netgate - and have bought > 10+ devices from them myself, but this lack of clarity/commitment really irks me:

    I subscribe to the Netgate newsletter - today I get this email:

    alt text

    They're still pushing the SG-3100 as a great device - but fail to mention that various packages don't work with it, but will on x86 based hardware =(.

    @stephenw10 - Do you know if fixing Golang/Rust packages is still on the roadmap for Netgate developers? Just having a clear answer would be good, so we know whether to keep buying the SG-3100, or if an x86-based option is a better choice.



  • I just saw the announcement of a new ARM-based device, the Netgate SG-2100.

    Any chance that means Telegraf (and other Go/Rust packages) will be working on the Netgate ARM boxes soon?



  • @victorhooi telegraf is in the package manager on the SG-1100 and has been running pretty reliably.
    As for the SG-2100, I’m still underwhelmed by FreeBSD on ARM in general and honestly for the same money I can get an x86 based Protectli FW2 with more horsepower and much more disk in the form of NVMe. I just can’t see justifying the SG-2100 purchase unless you don’t want to run Community Edition.



  • @jlw52761

    I’m thinking about upgrading from the 1100 to the 2100 as it offers 4x the Ram and additional physical ports. The 1100 has been very stable and reliable for me but not really enough memory for running additional plugins. I would by the Netgate over the Protectli to support the company, their mission and their values.



  • @zaxxon you can purchase the TAC support and support the company or just donate. In the end it is about what fits your needs and if the SG-1100 has been fitting the bill then the SG-2100 definitely will.



  • It would be nice if the SG-3100 had 4GB of RAM, in due time maybe with the new release Telegraf will be supported.


  • Netgate Administrator

    The SG-2100 does support Telegraf because, like the SG-1100, it is arm64 which means the cross compiling issues can be worked around and native compiling is possible.
    The problem here is 32bit arm, so the SG-3100 and SG-1000. Currently we have no solution to that but we would very much like to. We are still looking into ways to do this.

    BTW the FW2 does not support NVMe, it's mSATA like most systems of that age. So don't buy an NVMe drive if you have one. 😉

    Steve


  • Banned

    Is there any update on this please?


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