• Hello everyone.

    I'm having troubles getting to my website (www.spikedevelopments.com) from outside my network.

    My ISP has recently removed the public option from my account and says they are now pushing everyone to IPv6. However, since this is new to them they cannot tell me how to set it up in pfsense. Long story short, I got IPv6 to work and get IPv6 addresses for all my clients. I even have IPv6 addresses for my docker containers.

    I have my web server in a docker container on my server. I can successfully ping6 google from inside the docker container and get packets back. However when I try to access the website, I get a connection error. It seems like a firewall issue but I don't know how to set it to get the traffic through. I do have my web server listening on different ports.


  • Your web site's domain name does not resolve to any IP address. I get "NXDOMAIN", which means "non-existent domain name".

    Do you have your web site's domain name properly registered with a domain registrar, and do you also have a proper host record defined in the DNS of that registrar?


  • Yes, I'm using google domains. I have the name pointing to the IPv6 address.


  • I just tried again, and this time the name did resolve for me to an IPv6 address. Unfortunately, I do not have native IPv6 available from my ISP and I have temporarily disabled my Hurricane Electric IPv6 tunnel because I got tired of fighting streaming issues on my grandkids iOS devices (yeah, I could probably fix it, but it would require some baby sitting and I just grew weary).

    So I can't test actually connecting to your web site. The main issue with accessing an IPv6-only web site is going to be the availability of an IPv6 client address at your remote location. So how, and more importantly from where, are you testing remotely accessing your web site?


  • So the question I have now is how can I translate the IPv4 of the web server to IPv6 of the webserver?

    It would seem most people would be trying to connect using IPv4 while I can only use IPv6 to server the webpage

  • LAYER 8 Global Moderator

    Hosting a site on IPv6 only is going to drastically reduce who can actually access it.. You understand the VAST majority of the planet, no matter what some people around here think do not actually have IPv6 at all..

    While it is the future sure, only have IPv6 access is going to be a very small % of people that can actually get there.

    edit: If your isp is not giving you IPv4 address anymore - you have couple of options. Host this site somewhere else. Or run a vpn that allows you to port forward traffic down your vpn.


  • @johnpoz said in IPv6 and Docker:

    Hosting a site on IPv6 only is going to drastically reduce who can actually access it.. You understand the VAST majority of the planet, no matter what some people around here think do not actually have IPv6 at all..

    While it is the future sure, only have IPv6 access is going to be a very small % of people that can actually get there.

    edit: If your isp is not giving you IPv4 address anymore - you have couple of options. Host this site somewhere else. Or run a vpn that allows you to port forward traffic down your vpn.

    John, I was afraid that was the case. My ISP is offering a public IPv4 for a price. I might take them up on that.

  • LAYER 8 Global Moderator

    Depending on what your wanting to serve up, and what your ISP is going to charge you for the IPv4 address. Could be easier and more cost effective to just serve your whatever up via some hosting somewhere.


  • @johnpoz said in IPv6 and Docker:

    Depending on what your wanting to serve up, and what your ISP is going to charge you for the IPv4 address. Could be easier and more cost effective to just serve your whatever up via some hosting somewhere.

    They told me $10/month. I don't think any other hosting to beat that, but I haven't looked into it

  • LAYER 8 Global Moderator

    10$ a month... Dude depending on what your wanting to host exactly you could spin up a vps for like $15 a YEAR

    You could spin up a digital ocean droplet for $5 a month, etc. Shared hosting can be had for very cheap as well.

    I just spun up a new vps the other day for $2 a month.. 512MB ram, 10G storage, unmetered bandwidth..