Aes-ni not working?



  • I've built myself a lab so i can test the performance of pfsense in different scenarios. The setup looks like this:

    It consists if 3 shuttle PC's with dual nics.

    Top and bottom is used for firewall installations. The middle one is used solely as a router.

    Top and bottom is a Shuttle XH61V with an I5-3470 cpu (aes-ni capable)
    The Shuttle in the middle is a XG41 with a Core 2 duo 8400. Maximum thoughput of this box is ~820mbit

    I'm using Iperf to test the throughput between the Knoppix installations.

    I've limited the I5-3470 CPU's to 2 cores (easier to see performance impact when enabling/disabling features in pfsense)

    When testing with a NAT on port 5001 on the WAN interface on one of the firewalls i get 815mbit throughput. This tells me the setup is working.

    When testing with an VPN with Phase 2 AES-256bit encryption i get ~190mbit throughput.

    If i then enable AES-NI in "advanced - miscellaneous" and test again, i ~get 190mbit.

    I don't see a difference in CPU usage with aes-ni enabled/disabled.

    Am I doing it wrong?




  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Sounds like it should be right. You're enabling AES-NI on both firewalls at the same time?

    What does the output of "cryptostat" look like without it enabled, and with it enabled?

    I added the support in for AES-NI but I don't have access to any hardware that is capable of using it, so I couldn't test it.



  • What is the output of

    kldstat

    kldload aesni

    (run from CLI)



  • @jimp:

    Sounds like it should be right. You're enabling AES-NI on both firewalls at the same time?

    What does the output of "cryptostat" look like without it enabled, and with it enabled?

    I added the support in for AES-NI but I don't have access to any hardware that is capable of using it, so I couldn't test it.

    cryptostat = command not found

    I assume you wanted me to run the command in a cli.



  • @dhatz:

    What is the output of

    kldstat

    kldload aesni

    (run from CLI)

    kldstat:
    id  refs    address        size        name
    1    4      0xc0400000  13a57e8  kernel
    2    1      0xc858a000  4000        aesni.ko

    kldstat aesni:
    can't load aesni: File exists


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Sorry that should be cryptostats. I left off the s.



  • @jimp:

    Sorry that should be cryptostats. I left off the s.

    same output whether aes-ni enabled or disabled:

    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(12): cryptostats
    0 symmetric crypto ops (0 errors, 0 times driver blocked)
    0 key ops (0 errors, 0 times driver blocked)
    0 crypto dispatch thread activations
    0 crypto return thread activations



  • @miloman:

    kldstat:
    id   refs    address        size         name
    1    4       0xc0400000  13a57e8   kernel
    2    1       0xc858a000  4000        aesni.ko

    kldstat aesni:
    can't load aesni: File exists

    So it's already loaded. Try

    kldunload aesni
    kldload aesni

    the output of the latter command indicates if the aesni driver thinks AES-NI is supported by your hw.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    also:

    dmesg | grep -i aes

    It may be that the driver isn't attaching to your chip. Your chip may not support AES-NI or it may be a newer chip than the AES-NI driver knows about.



  • @dhatz:

    @miloman:

    kldstat:
    id   refs    address        size         name
    1    4       0xc0400000  13a57e8   kernel
    2    1       0xc858a000  4000        aesni.ko

    kldstat aesni:
    can't load aesni: File exists

    So it's already loaded. Try

    kldunload aesni
    kldload aesni

    the output of the latter command indicates if the aesni driver thinks AES-NI is supported by your hw.

    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(9): kldunload aesni
    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(10): kldstat
    Id Refs Address    Size    Name
    1    1 0xc0400000 13a57e8  kernel

    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(11): kldload aesni
    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(12): kldstat
    Id Refs Address    Size    Name
    1    4 0xc0400000 13a57e8  kernel
    2    1 0xc813c000 4000    aesni.ko



  • @jimp:

    also:

    dmesg | grep -i aes

    It may be that the driver isn't attaching to your chip. Your chip may not support AES-NI or it may be a newer chip than the AES-NI driver knows about.

    [2.1-BETA0][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(13): dmesg | grep -i aes
      Features2=0x77bae3ff<sse3,pclmulqdq,dtes64,mon,ds_cpl,vmx,smx,est,tm2,ssse3,cx16,xtpr,pdcm,pcid,sse4.1,sse4.2,x2apic,popcnt,tscdlt,aesni,xsave,avx,f16c,<b30>>
    aesni0: <aes-cbc,aes-xts>on motherboard
    aesni0: detached
    aesni0: <aes-cbc,aes-xts>on motherboard
    aesni0: detached
    aesni0: <aes-cbc,aes-xts>on motherboard
    aesni0: detached
    aesni0: <aes-cbc,aes-xts>on motherboard</aes-cbc,aes-xts></aes-cbc,aes-xts></aes-cbc,aes-xts></aes-cbc,aes-xts></sse3,pclmulqdq,dtes64,mon,ds_cpl,vmx,smx,est,tm2,ssse3,cx16,xtpr,pdcm,pcid,sse4.1,sse4.2,x2apic,popcnt,tscdlt,aesni,xsave,avx,f16c,<b30>



  • any updates regarding aes-ni not working?

    i have a test environment with aes-ni capabilities that i'd be more than happy to let you use for testing.



  • I just registered to leave back my high interest in this topic.
    We built our latest internal-test appliance based on xeon e3-1220Lv2 (Dual-Core 2,3 GHz Low-Voltage) which has AES-NI build in.
    With the latest 2.1 pfsense we expected ipsec VPN performance with aes-256 reaching 1 Gbit/s.
    But in fact we only get around 230 MBit/s, or as use case 27 MB/s with File-Transfers between sites.
    Without ipsec we can transfer with almost 1 GBit/s.
    With Quad-Core (E3-1260L) we get almost the same.
    Cryptostats tells:
    79369 symmetric crypto ops (0 errors, 0 times driver blocked)
    0 key ops (0 errors, 0 times driver blocked)
    0 crypto dispatch thread activations
    0 crypto return thread activations

    –> it's not beeing used. Besides that we have the same output as the previous posters, dmesg reports AES-NI, device/driver is loaded and activated.
    Also the performance is exactly the same with aes enabled or not.

    Which leaves two big "downsides" right now with pfsense and high-performance hardware:

    First: ipsec is not multithreaded. It is only using one core, so only Gigahertz matters not core-count. For mixed usage that is ok, e.g. 500.000 Sessions hitting the packet-filter and besides that some 100 Mbit/s VPN Tunnels you get overall good performance. But as site-to-site link we only care for ipsec netto transfer rates.
    With two cores we could get 400 Mbit/s with that E3-1220L (CPU Load is 55 percent with 230 MBit/s and 2 Cores).

    Second: aes-ni not working. With one core and aes-ni I was thinking the calculated performance should be 2 GBit/s.

    This can also be verified with vmware and aes-ni capable CPUs, as vmware passes that feature though.

    I think this should be focused on, as aes capable cpus will be standard on all systems and this is supported since 2 generations of intel cpus (westmere & sandy bridge).
    All other things of pfsense are already more than minimum needed. With ipsec-nat reaching the latest 2.1 this is becoming one big thing to consider at companyside, only missing central managing.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    As far as I know, we still don't have any routers capable of AES-NI in the hands of any developers for testing.

    In absence of that, it's going to take some debugging from those that have the hardware.

    First step would be to try configuring/using AES-NI on a stock FreeBSD 8.3 image to see if it works for them there.

    We are loading the module, which is supposed to be sufficient for actually using it. So the first big question is whether or not we're doing something else in the OS that breaks it, or perhaps it is broken or not configured correctly in the stock OS without our changes.

    It's possible that the backporting of AES-NI to FreeBSD 8.3 from 9.x missed something, if that is the case, this probably won't work 100% until we move to a FreeBSD 9.x base. Checking that means comparing the results of the stock FreeBSD 8.3 test with a stock FreeBSD 9.1 test.



  • As i've previously stated, if you want to borrow my test-setup for testing please just pm me.

    I can set it up with the snapshot of your choice, and provide a jumphost from which you can reach the physical servers.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    @miloman:

    As i've previously stated, if you want to borrow my test-setup for testing please just pm me.

    I can set it up with the snapshot of your choice, and provide a jumphost from which you can reach the physical servers.

    Having remote access in this case isn't really all that helpful, it would take a ton of coordination and such to make the tests happen, since it would involve multiple reinstalls of a few different operating systems (pfSense, FreeBSD 8.3, FreeBSD 9.1) and various tests.

    Ideally either someone can run the tests directly on their own hardware, or eventually we'll get hardware on hand that supports it.



  • i can install vmware esxi on the hardware… with a jumphost you can do snapshots and reinstall as much as you like. :)


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Ran across something today that might narrow something down.

    Can you run this on your board?

    # /usr/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    # /usr/local/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    
    

    Also the next round of 1.1 images should have OpenSSL 1.0.1, and from what I've read, that contains better support for AES-NI.



  • sorry for the late reply… i've been very busy.

    image: pfSense-memstick-2.1-BETA1-i386-20130130-0420.img

    /usr/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    (cryptodev) BSD cryptodev engine
    [RSA, RSA, DH]
    [available]
    (padlock) VIA PadLock (no-RNG, no-ACE)
    [unavailable]
    (dynamic) Dynamic engine loading support
    [unavailable]

    /usr/local/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    (cryptodev) BSD cryptodev engine
    [RSA, RSA, DH]
    [available]
    (rdrand) Intel RDRAND engine
    [RAND]
    [available]
    (dynamic) Dynamic engine loading support
    [unavailable]
    (padlock) VIA PadLock: not supported
    [unavailable]


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Is aesni.ko loaded during those tests? (check the output of kldstat)

    I would expect to see at least AES-128-CBC in the cryptodev list if it attached, but then again, some others have reported that OpenSSL 1.0.1 did use AES-NI but didn't ever report it as being present, so it may take some more speed tests to tell for sure…



  • i entered the commands in the shell of a fresh image i just bootet up. i haven't configured/enabled anything at all.

    if i enter the command "kldload aesni" i get this output:
    padlock0: No ACE support
    aesni0: AES-CBC,AES-XTS on motherboard


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Does that openssl engine output change after having run the kldload?



  • yes…

    /usr/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    (cryptodev) BSD cryptodev engine
    [RSA, RSA, DH, [b]AES-128-CBC]
      [available]
    (padlock) VIA PadLock (no-RNG, no-ACE)
      [unavailable]
    (dynamic) Dynamic engine loading support
      [unavailable]

    /usr/local/bin/openssl engine -t -c
    (cryptodev) BSD cryptodev engine
    [RSA, RSA, DH,[b] AES-128-CBC, AES-192-CBC, AES-256-CBC]
      [available]
    (rdrand) Intel RDRAND engine
    [RAND]
      [available]
    (dynamic) Dynamic engine loading support
      [unavailable]
    (padlock) VIA PadLock: not supported
      [unavailable]


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    ok, great.

    One more thing if you have some time:

    1. Reboot so aes-ni is not loaded.
    2. Run the following in order:

    Test speed before

    /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed

    Load AES-NI

    kldload aesni

    Test OpenSSL with default engine

    /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed

    Test OpenSSL with cryptodev engine

    /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed -engine cryptodev
    /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed -engine cryptodev



  • heres your wall of text. :)

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(1): /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    To get the most accurate results, try to run this
    program when this computer is idle.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 18546805 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 5035121 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1289095 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 325137 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 40722 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 0.9.8q 2 Dec 2010
    built on: date not available
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(idx,int) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc
    available timing options: USE_TOD HZ=128 [sysconf value]
    timing function used: gettimeofday
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      98891.21k  107382.09k  109967.84k  110944.78k  111161.64k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(2): /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 108688414 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 28926457 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 7348512 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1844550 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 230842 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    built on: Sun Jan 27 13:05:44 EST 2013
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(8x,mmx) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) idea(int) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DZLIB_SHARED -DZLIB -DOPENSSL_THREADS -pthread -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -Wa,–noexecstack -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIOS -O3 -fomit-frame-pointer -Wall -O2 -pipe -fno-strict-aliasing -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_PART_WORDS -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DRMD160_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc    579671.54k  617097.75k  627073.02k  629606.40k  630352.55k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(3): kldload aesni

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(4): /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    To get the most accurate results, try to run this
    program when this computer is idle.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2725774 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2507908 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1925032 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1029235 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 147766 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 0.9.8q 2 Dec 2010
    built on: date not available
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(idx,int) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc
    available timing options: USE_TOD HZ=128 [sysconf value]
    timing function used: gettimeofday
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      14535.69k    53485.26k  164217.56k  351201.58k  403372.36k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(5): /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2719290 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2505062 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1919653 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1028277 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 147809 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    built on: Sun Jan 27 13:05:44 EST 2013
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(8x,mmx) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) idea(int) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DZLIB_SHARED -DZLIB -DOPENSSL_THREADS -pthread -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -Wa,–noexecstack -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIOS -O3 -fomit-frame-pointer -Wall -O2 -pipe -fno-strict-aliasing -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_PART_WORDS -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DRMD160_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      14502.88k    53441.32k  163384.91k  350985.22k  403617.11k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(6): /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed -engine cryptodev
    engine "cryptodev" set.
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    To get the most accurate results, try to run this
    program when this computer is idle.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2721627 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2516799 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1926157 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1029088 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 147941 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 0.9.8q 2 Dec 2010
    built on: date not available
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(idx,int) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc
    available timing options: USE_TOD HZ=128 [sysconf value]
    timing function used: gettimeofday
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      14514.45k    53674.88k  164313.53k  351151.19k  403847.11k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfSense.localdomain]/root(7): /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed -engine cryptodev
    engine "cryptodev" set.
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2733266 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2512115 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1928735 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1031083 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 147874 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    built on: Sun Jan 27 13:05:44 EST 2013
    options:bn(64,32) md2(int) rc4(8x,mmx) des(ptr,risc1,16,long) aes(partial) idea(int) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DZLIB_SHARED -DZLIB -DOPENSSL_THREADS -pthread -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -Wa,–noexecstack -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIOS -O3 -fomit-frame-pointer -Wall -O2 -pipe -fno-strict-aliasing -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_PART_WORDS -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DRMD160_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      14577.42k    53591.79k  164157.89k  351943.00k  403794.60k


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    @miloman:

    heres your wall of text. :)

    Thanks :-)

    Summarizing a little…
    @miloman:

    OpenSSL 0.9.8q, aesni.ko UNloaded:
    aes-128-cbc      98891.21k  107382.09k  109967.84k  110944.78k  111161.64k

    OpenSSL 1.0.1c, aesni.ko UNloaded:
    aes-128-cbc    579671.54k  617097.75k  627073.02k  629606.40k  630352.55k

    OpenSSL 0.9.8q, aesni.ko loaded:
    aes-128-cbc      14535.69k    53485.26k  164217.56k  351201.58k  403372.36k

    OpenSSL 1.0.1c, aesni.ko loaded:
    aes-128-cbc      14502.88k    53441.32k  163384.91k  350985.22k  403617.11k

    OpenSSL 0.9.8q, aesni.ko loaded, cryptodev engine:
    aes-128-cbc      14514.45k    53674.88k  164313.53k  351151.19k  403847.11k

    OpenSSL 1.0.1c, aesni.ko loaded, cryptodev engine
    aes-128-cbc      14577.42k    53591.79k  164157.89k  351943.00k  403794.60k

    It looks like loading aesni.ko does make it get used, since there is a substantial difference between the base system aesni before and after it is loaded.
    Oddly, OpenSSL 1.0.1c without aesni.ko loaded is even faster. I'm not sure if that's somehow linked to OpenSSL's internal aesni support that may be getting dragged down by cryptodev or what.

    If you repeat that test (just the first two commands), are the results the same each time?

    Once aesni.ko is loaded it doesn't seem to matter which version of openssl is used or the engine used, too, suggesting at least the speed command is autoselecting the engine based on the cipher being used. (I confirmed this is also the case on ALIX with glxsb). So the last two commands can be ignored apparently.



  • If you repeat that test (just the first two commands), are the results the same each time?

    yes… i ran the commands a couple of times to see if the speed/results were consistent.

    let me know if you need me to test anything else. :)


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    It may be helpful if others with capable hardware could run the same test, I started a spreadsheet here:
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AojFUXcbH0ROdE15eHB4dndHTXZYcU1mQm9Dc3V2elE

    The only other thing to try is a similar test but with actual VPN traffic (e.g. OpenVPN using AES-128-CBC) to see if (a) throughput is improved and/or (b) cpu usage reduced under load.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Thought of one more thing:

    cryptotest -va aes128
    
    


  • Just out of curiosity, I wonder how big the difference is when you do not use EVP (e.g. without -evp). Or is AES-NI only used when using EVP anyway?



  • Intel(R) Core(TM) i5 CPU 660 @ 3.33GHz

    (cryptodev) BSD cryptodev engine
    [RSA, DSA, DH, AES-128-CBC, AES-192-CBC, AES-256-CBC]
        [ available ]
    (rsax) RSAX engine support
    [RSA]
        [ available ]

    cryptotest -a aes 100000 100000
    23.461 sec,  200000    aes crypts,  100000 bytes, 852493443 byte/sec,  6504.0 Mb/sec

    /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -engine cryptodev -multi 4
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    evp              33879.67k  137175.74k  474658.63k  1254087.68k  1675531.61k

    /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-256-cbc -engine cryptodev -multi 4
    evp              33888.18k  135526.57k  447022.51k  1109458.88k  1423601.97k



  • Input from my machine an virtualized pfsense in esxi 5.1. (AES NI working on other win7 guest, so its correctly passthroughed)
    ESXI host specs:
    Xeon 1220
    32gb ram
    Intel NICs

    pfSense guest specs:
    2 cores
    1gb ram
    VMxNet3 nics

    Before kldload aesni

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfsense.localdomain]/root(1): /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    To get the most accurate results, try to run this
    program when this computer is idle.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 25200854 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 7556040 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 1974553 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 506622 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 63906 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    OpenSSL 0.9.8q 2 Dec 2010
    built on: date not available
    options:bn(64,64) md2(int) rc4(ptr,int) des(idx,cisc,16,int) aes(partial) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc
    available timing options: USE_TOD HZ=128 [sysconf value]
    timing function used: gettimeofday
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc    134377.68k  160686.63k  167961.52k  172378.58k  173953.57k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfsense.localdomain]/root(3): /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 111268869 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 30363529 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 7753535 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1944836 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 243389 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    built on: Sun Jan 27 13:08:29 EST 2013
    options:bn(64,64) md2(int) rc4(16x,int) des(idx,cisc,16,int) aes(partial) idea(int) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DZLIB_SHARED -DZLIB -DOPENSSL_THREADS -pthread -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -Wa,–noexecstack -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIOS -O3 -DMD32_REG_T=int -Wall -O2 -pipe -fno-strict-aliasing -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT5 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DBSAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc    593433.97k  646072.80k  659916.45k  662113.10k  662887.96k

    after kldload aesni

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfsense.localdomain]/root(5): /usr/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    To get the most accurate results, try to run this
    program when this computer is idle.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2914003 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2776488 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 2127090 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1097708 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 129159 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    OpenSSL 0.9.8q 2 Dec 2010
    built on: date not available
    options:bn(64,64) md2(int) rc4(ptr,int) des(idx,cisc,16,int) aes(partial) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc
    available timing options: USE_TOD HZ=128 [sysconf value]
    timing function used: gettimeofday
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      15517.00k    59045.34k  180937.99k  373499.22k  351573.93k

    [2.1-BETA1][admin@pfsense.localdomain]/root(6): /usr/local/bin/openssl speed -evp aes-128-cbc -elapsed
    You have chosen to measure elapsed time instead of user CPU time.
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 16 size blocks: 2870466 aes-128-cbc's in 3.00s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 64 size blocks: 2702743 aes-128-cbc's in 3.02s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 256 size blocks: 2093458 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 1024 size blocks: 1087780 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    Doing aes-128-cbc for 3s on 8192 size blocks: 130583 aes-128-cbc's in 3.01s
    OpenSSL 1.0.1c 10 May 2012
    built on: Sun Jan 27 13:08:29 EST 2013
    options:bn(64,64) md2(int) rc4(16x,int) des(idx,cisc,16,int) aes(partial) idea(int) blowfish(idx)
    compiler: cc -fPIC -DOPENSSL_PIC -DZLIB_SHARED -DZLIB -DOPENSSL_THREADS -pthread -D_REENTRANT -DDSO_DLFCN -DHAVE_DLFCN_H -Wa,–noexecstack -DL_ENDIAN -DTERMIOS -O3 -DMD32_REG_T=int -Wall -O2 -pipe -fno-strict-aliasing -DOPENSSL_IA32_SSE2 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_MONT5 -DOPENSSL_BN_ASM_GF2m -DSHA1_ASM -DSHA256_ASM -DSHA512_ASM -DMD5_ASM -DAES_ASM -DVPAES_ASM -DBSAES_ASM -DWHIRLPOOL_ASM -DGHASH_ASM
    The 'numbers' are in 1000s of bytes per second processed.
    type            16 bytes    64 bytes    256 bytes  1024 bytes  8192 bytes
    aes-128-cbc      15309.15k    57359.77k  178177.74k  370331.17k  355652.47k

    I can add that i have tested actual VPN performance which conclude.
    Speed measured with iperf on 2 windows 7 machines one on LAN and on WAN

    If i just route between 2 nets without an tunnel the speeds are well above Gbit speed. CPU usage = ~75%

    If i use the vpn tunnel with AES 128 the speed is around 300mbit (around same speed with BSD engine, no hardware , and RSX engine). CPU usage ~40%

    If i use the vpn tunnel with NO encryption the speed is still around 300mbit.

    Not really sure why as soon as the tunnel is used the speed no more than 300mbit.

    Hope this helps!
    Let me know if I should test something else.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    You might be hitting a general openvpn limit at some point there, check threads around the forum here, you might at least try this tweak:
    http://forum.pfsense.org/index.php/topic,47567.0.html

    Your numbers seem to coincide with the similar numbers from the previous tester as well.

    Did you happen to try the VPN speed without aesni.ko loaded? Or just with and toggling the engine setting?



  • Actually now that you say it. I only tested the vpn speed without the aesni.ko loaded. I should test it with it loaded.

    Ill also check the thread with the tweak.

    EDIT: I tested with the aesni.ko loaded no speedchange. Might be higher cpu usage though not entirely sure.
    Also tested the ip fastforwarding tweak which had no effect.



  • Did anyone ever discover why there was no apparent change in performance with aes-ni enabled?  I did a search for aes-ni and aesni but didn't see any further threads.  I don't have a system with aes-ni on 2.1 yet.



  • I see you are testing IPsec earlier and some openvpn. I would be interested in knowing what the maximum throughput you might get with all 4 cores enabled, using 4 separate clients connecting to 1 server each client on a different port with separate openvpn instance for each.  Its probably not part of your testing, bit would be interesting to know if it will saturate a gigabit interface.

    As far as file transferes from 1 computer to another be careful that drive read/write speed isn't a bottleneck.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    @adam65535:

    Did anyone ever discover why there was no apparent change in performance with aes-ni enabled?  I did a search for aes-ni and aesni but didn't see any further threads.  I don't have a system with aes-ni on 2.1 yet.

    Not yet, mostly for lack of a good test setup. We're building up some test rigging/infrastructure to get some good throughput numbers for the new book and for other purposes and I believe some of that hardware does have AES-NI, so we may have better information in the coming months.



  • jimp, If I have time I will probably throw a 2.1 snapshot one of the Dell R320 servers I have and see how the openssl test does on it.  I assume it will reveal the same results as everyone else though.

    kejianshi,  I just don't have time to do that kind of testing right now.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    A single test probably won't really tell us much. What we'd really need to see is a pair of identical systems configured identically back-to-back (but with different IPs/subnets as needed) and see what kind of LAN-to-LAN throughput we can obtain through an active/live VPN in each of the test cases

    1. aesni.ko loaded, OpenVPN set to use cryptodev
    2. aesni.ko loaded, OpenVPN set to "no hardware"
    3. aesni.ko unloaded, OpenVPN set to use cryptodev
    4. aesni.ko unloaded, OpenVPN set to "no hardware"



  • My AMD FX-8150 at a remote site with aes-ni absolutely smokes my Intel CPUs without aes-ni in these openssl tests.
    Its not even close.