DIY clone build, based on pfSense's C2758 1U.



  • When it comes to pre-built, I'm currently looking at these three units:
    $899
    https://store.pfsense.org/SG8860
    $699
    https://store.pfsense.org/SG4860
    $499
    https://store.pfsense.org/SG2440
    I'd really love to get this, but @1399 it's just too pricey
    https://store.pfsense.org/c2758

    All of the prices don't include currency conversion or postage to my country, no idea what that is yet.
    Basic differences outlined here: https://www.pfsense.org/products/
    I'm tempted by the ready-built "appliances" pfSense is offering, but I'm not convinced the value proposition is there.

    Has anyone built exactly the same device as one of these 4 units? I'd be surprised if no-one's done this before.
    The chassis & cooling aspects needn't be the same, but ideally the board & most other core specs would be.
    A C2758 build interests me most of all, mainly (but not exclusively) because it's geared for a RU form-factor.
    But if 8860, 4860, or 2440 components can be shoehorned into a RU for much less, then I'd be similarly interested.
    So I guess my main question is: Is there a full parts list for the: C2758, 8860, 4860, & 2440? (in that order of preference)
    I'm only asking about components that aren't proprietary, anything proprietary can remain so, not asking folks to hand over trade secrets! :)

    With that info. I'd then be able to hunt down the best price for every part, & calculate the total cost for each build.
    If some parts are proprietary or unknown, then hopefully some folks here are able to point to a non-proprietary equivalent?
    Once I know the total cost for the 4 builds, I'd then decide whether or not to go the DIY or pre-built route for one of the 4.
    Even if I did go totally DIY route…
    I'd still support pfSense "the company" by lodging support queries occasionally, in-fact probably quite often -initially.
    I've much to learn about that area actually, so if anyone can fill me in there too, I'd be ever so grateful?!?

    I realise the priciest models are overkill for my needs, but that's beside the point, I still want to see what I'd be looking at for DIY builds.
    If it turns out the C2758, 8860, & 4860 builds are still too pricey for my liking, then I can always settle for a 2440 DIY build.
    Furthermore, it may turn out that there's little diff. in total cost for the DIY builds Vs pre-built units, whereupon I may go for one of the pre-builts.
    When I upgrade to a far beefier RU NAS soon, I can always satisfy my curiosity for using pfSense on much beefier hw, by chucking it in a VM :)

    Okay, I think that's all much clearer than originally, so hopefully we have no misunderstanding's this time.

    Thank-you.



  • The SG systems are all custom designs from ADI Engineering.  You aren't likely to find another reseller and as such, what you're asking now, and what you were asking in the other thread, is not possible.

    As to the last one, a simple search would tell you that it's this:

    http://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-FTN4.cfm

    You can get it for about $500, plus the cost of the RAM ($80) and SSD ($100).  A pair of support incidents adds $400.  Purchases from the store include assembly, install of pfSense, and a centralized warranty so you don't need to contact individual vendors on your own.



  • @Jason:

    The SG systems are all custom designs from ADI Engineering. 
    You aren't likely to find another reseller and as such, what you're asking now is not possible.

    Are you able to be a bit more specific about which components are custom?
    To clarify: is it just the chassis & cooling, the entire board & power-delivery, or literally the entire unit etc?
    Based on what you said, I more-or-less assumed the "whole shebang", but it'd be good to know for sure.
    If you're not 100% sure that's cool… :)

    As to the last one, a simple search would tell you that it's this:
    http://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-FTN4.cfm
    You can get it for about $500, plus the cost of the RAM ($80) and SSD ($100).  A pair of support incidents adds $400.  Purchases from the store include assembly, install of pfSense, and a centralized warranty so you don't need to contact individual vendors on your own.

    Hallelujah, thank-you, thank-you very much kind sir!!!

    Apologies in advance if I upset you by asking the same Qn one final time, but just to confirm:
    Excluding the RAM/SSD/Support/Assembly/Install/Centralised_Warranty, this is literally exactly the same device?

    Thanks again.



  • Wow.

    The main boards are custom designs which is basically the entire product.



  • Why the neg? I answered your question (which you updated after I answered it).

    You truly don't know how to deal with people.



  • @Shonky:

    Wow.

    The main boards are custom designs which is basically the entire product.

    @Shonky:

    Why the neg? I answered your question (which you updated after I answered it).

    You truly don't know how to deal with people.

    Yes, I clarified the point, I meant to put something like that in earlier but simply forgot, your post reminded me, the post is directed at someone else.
    I think you know very well why there was a neg, regardless, I've removed it now, please stop harassing me in every thread.



  • @jalyst:

    @Jason:

    The SG systems are all custom designs from ADI Engineering. 
    You aren't likely to find another reseller and as such, what you're asking now is not possible.

    Are you able to be a bit more specific about which components are custom?
    To clarify: is it just the chassis & cooling, the entire board & power-delivery, or literally the entire unit etc?
    Based on what you said, I more-or-less assumed the "whole shebang", but it'd be good to know for sure.
    If you're not 100% sure that's cool… :)

    As to the last one, a simple search would tell you that it's this:
    http://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-FTN4.cfm
    You can get it for about $500, plus the cost of the RAM ($80) and SSD ($100).  A pair of support incidents adds $400.  Purchases from the store include assembly, install of pfSense, and a centralized warranty so you don't need to contact individual vendors on your own.

    Hallelujah, thank-you, thank-you very much kind sir!!!

    Apologies in advance if I upset you by asking the same Qn one final time, but just to confirm:
    Excluding the RAM/SSD/Support/Assembly/Install/Centralised_Warranty, this is literally exactly the same device?

    Thanks again.

    The SG systems are designed by ADI with some options (eg. how much onboard flash, which CPU, etc.) spec'd by the VAR at the time of order.  The odds of you getting another one like it, without ordering in bulk directly from ADI, is essentially zero.

    Yes, the Supermicro box I posted is the same one as in the pfSense store.  The prices I gave are approximate for (2) 4GB ECC DDR3 SODIMMs & an 80GB Intel DC S3500 SSD.


  • Netgate Administrator

    Yes, effectively you cannot make an exact clone of the ADI boxes. Though you could probably make something similar.
    The ADI board is only available is large quantities as Jason said. And in fact we have some custom options on there too. Everything is on board so there are no separate parts to order. The case is custom designed and built for us. On the larger units even the heatsink/fan is custom for us.

    Steve



  • Yes, the Supermicro box I posted is the same one as in the pfSense store.  The prices I gave are approximate for (2) 4GB ECC DDR3 SODIMMs & an 80GB Intel DC S3500 SSD.

    Thanks, main list of parts to be assessed & then bought, is below:

    (1)
    Any special reason why one might prefer the SSD-DC-S3500 series over anything else at roughly the same price-point ATM?
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/solid-state-drives/solid-state-drives-dc-s3500-series.html
    Deals with WA etc better perhaps?
    The two models I list below are more consumer geared IIRC, so perhaps the fw/controller is more optimised for diff. sort of I/O.

    A)
    Evo range still looks pretty decent, but no idea how all these SSD's compare lately:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OBRE5UE/

    B)
    I may have access to an ExtremeII SSD (240GB) that's barely been used:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/7006/sandisk-extreme-ii-review-480gb
    Doesn't seem to be on Amazon any more, replaced by 480GB revision:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00COF7E3K
    AFAICT, the ExtremeII range has been superseded by the ExtremePro range:
    http://www.sandisk.com/products/ssd/sata/

    (2)
    Also RAM; apart from ECC, the right mem. bandwidth, & whether or not to get 4 or 8GB modules.
    Any other characteristics & makes/models I should look out for, or does one not need to be too picky?
    This looks okay, but I probably only need 4GB modules (x2), at least for now, not sure:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CUYOGRM

    (3)
    Looking at the no's, the 5018A-FTN4's 200w PSU is plenty decent, but is there better after-market ones worthwhile considering?
    (power-efficiency & 24/7 consumption are also really important for this build)

    Nvm, after having read through this article (esp. the conclusion), + ~several posts from here onwards;
    It def. sounds good enough, I doubt the small improvements gained with an alt. PSU, would be worth the extra expense/time?!

    (4)
    I may also need a few more Gbit ports, 10Gbe I think is overkill from this device to my switch.
    So any recommendations there are greatly appreciated too…

    Actually probably not needed, 5018A-FTN4 already has 4x Gbit ports…
    If need more, will just buy a dedicated 4-8port Gbit+ eth switch, or use the PCIE 2.0 x8 slot for something like this.

    Any other final components you think may be of use, please advise…

    Thanks again.

    Peripheral Components:
    (i.e. non-core components/parts)

    Might get one of these, too…
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005FYNSUA


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    Those cruzer fits (16GB) are what I use in pairs for FreeNAS boot.



  • Might want to look at this article.  You may run into issues with the supermicro MB.

    https://forum.pfsense.org/index.php?topic=93999.0



  • @kapara:

    Might want to look at this article.  You may run into issues with the supermicro MB.

    https://forum.pfsense.org/index.php?topic=93999.0

    I'm afraid that's not a motherboard issue, but a FreeBSD issue. It's not the only motherboard affected, and it's easily fixable in the OS.



  • @jalyst:

    (1)
    Any special reason why one might prefer the SSD-DC-S3500 series over anything else at roughly the same price-point ATM?
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/solid-state-drives/solid-state-drives-dc-s3500-series.html
    Deals with WA etc better perhaps?
    The two models I list below are more consumer geared IIRC, so perhaps the fw/controller is more optimised for diff. sort of I/O.

    A)
    Evo range still looks pretty decent, but no idea how all these SSD's compare lately:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OBRE5UE/

    B)
    I may have access to an ExtremeII SSD (240GB) that's barely been used:
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/7006/sandisk-extreme-ii-review-480gb
    Doesn't seem to be on Amazon any more, replaced by 480GB revision:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00COF7E3K
    AFAICT, the ExtremeII range has been superseded by the ExtremePro range:
    http://www.sandisk.com/products/ssd/sata/

    (2)
    Also RAM; apart from ECC, the right mem. bandwidth, & whether or not to get 4 or 8GB modules.
    Any other characteristics & makes/models I should look out for, or does one not need to be too picky?
    This looks okay, but I probably only need 4GB modules (x2), at least for now, not sure:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CUYOGRM

    To answer some of my own outstanding queries…

    It clearly makes sense to go for the Extreme_II over the 3500...
    The 3500 is worse in most respects when compared to the SSD 730, & even the 730 doesn't perform quite as well as the Extreme_II "overall".
    http://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/838?vs=1141
    Compared to an Evo ~240GB it may be a different matter, but as I already have the Extreme_II I'm sticking with it, tis more than good enough.

    Ditto for the RAM, it's on the recommended list & is about as good as it gets for the type needed, + the vast majority of reviews are very +ve.
    I was firmly set on 2x8, but I may yet go back to 2x4, it depends on the total cost of this entire project (this build is just a small part of that).

    Later, I'll update on a whole bunch of other stuff...



  • @jalyst:

    It clearly makes sense to go for the Extreme_II over the 3500…
    The 3500 is worse in most respects when compared to the SSD 730, & even the 730 doesn't perform quite as well as the Extreme_II "overall".
    http://www.anandtech.com/bench/product/838?vs=1141
    Compared to an Evo ~240GB it may be a different matter, but as I already have the Extreme_II I'm sticking with it, tis more than good enough.

    Raw throughput and quoted IOPS on a consumer drive are not factors in a SSD purchase for a server.  The DC S3500 is an (entry) enterprise drive and has power loss protection, consistent performance under multi-user workloads, and a higher endurance rating.  The first is extremely important for any server, the latter two can have a big impact if you're using something like Squid.

    http://www.storagereview.com/intel_ssd_dc_s3500_enterprise_review



  • Yes, the last 2 I know, not hugely significant in my situation, the 1st point I'd forgotten about though.
    It's definitely worth some consideration… Thanks for your input...


  • Netgate Administrator

    Yes, I was just going to mention that. The power loss protection on the s3500 makes it a far better drive IMHO, epsecially for use in a pfSense box where drive thoughput is not often a factor.
    I am running some older Intel drives for that reason.

    Steve



  • Hope I'm not joining the conersation too late. I built my own c2558 supermicro based pfsense box for about $400.

    Build details are here –> http://www.reddit.com/r/PFSENSE/comments/2gpckc/pfsense_aesni_accelerated_ipsec_in_22/cklb8at



  • Will you be using disk intensive packages? If not, you could simply use NanoBSD from a USB stick or CF card (via a SATA-CF adapter) and it's gonna outlast any SSD or HDD ever…
    That's how I'm deploying two C2758s now.



  • @Jason:

    The DC S3500 is an (entry) enterprise drive and has power loss protection,<snip>The first is extremely important for any server,</snip>

    So consumer grade SSD's like the Extreme_II definitely don't have something like this? I've just started looking but so far I see nothing.
    What about the Intel X25-V's? I have 3x 40GB units from ~4yrs back which are barely used…
    N.B.
    I'll have a UPS rigged-up alongside or inside the 19" rack I'm installing, it's mainly to protect this build & my NAS (+ several other less important things).

    @baggar11:

    Hope I'm not joining the conersation too late. I built my own c2558 supermicro based pfsense box for about $400.

    Looking at those posts, it was a bit more than $400USD… :)
    Thanks, but I'm only interested in a C2758 build, I haven't researched pricing carefully yet.
    Best price so far (from Amazon) inc. shipping to my country is ~715USD.
    That's for the 2x8GB RAM (which I may drop to 2x4GB) & doesn't include a SSD.
    Not decided what I'll do WRT SSD, may use one of the models I already own.

    @robi:

    Will you be using disk intensive packages?

    Quite open to what I'll be doing, I have some fixed stuff, but I don't necessarily want to be locked down to that.



  • Most consumer-grade SSDs do not have any kind of power-loss protection, or it's limited (likely guarantees no corruption, but potentially loses data in flight).  I think the exception was the Intel 320.

    You can use whatever you want in your system, just be aware of the possible consequences.  Reinstalling pfSense isn't hard, I've got the Auto Config Backup, and I run CARP, so I really don't care on my machines at work.  My system at home, on the other hand, uses a better SSD.



  • Think I'll just stick with the Sandisk then…
    Esp. since I'll have a UPS for protection against sudden power-loss, & as you say it's not overly hard to get back up & running.

    Thanks mate!

    @stephenw10:

    I run some Intel 320s for that reason though in reality I almost certainly don't need the extra protection offered.
    As Jason says re-installing is not hard if you have a backup config file which you will, right?  ;)

    Of course…

    Cheers.


  • Netgate Administrator

    I run some Intel 320s for that reason though in reality I almost certainly don't need the extra protection offered.
    As Jason says re-installing is not hard if you have a backup config file which you will, right?  ;)

    Steve



  • @jalyst:

    Very near to "pulling the trigger", just a few more things to knock over (from a sep. but related project) & then I see this:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/9185/intel-xeon-d-review-performance-per-watt-server-soc-champion

    Hmmm….  ;D

    This could really be right, here are some benchmarks Xeon E312xxv3, Xeon E5, Xeon D1540.
    http://www.servethehome.com/intel-xeon-d-1540-performance-comparison/

    But at these days, today I mean nothing beats a Intel Xeon E3-12xxv3 / 4 cores / 3,0 GHz
    and related to the power consuming you should even also get an eye on what you need!
    Saving power is a fine thing, but if I really need horsepower for 1GBit/s and 100 MBit/s VPN it is more secondary.

    'd really love to get this, but @1399 it's just too pricey

    Supermicro C2758 Server for 850 €
    8 GB DDR3 ECC RAM ~120 €
    mSATA ~120 €
    shipping cost ~50 €
    = total 1140 € or $1.273

    but without any support and the system must be also installed and tuned by yours!
    So why it is too high pricey?

    Intel Xeon D-1540 Broadwell 14 nm will be around ~900 € - 1000 € but for the board only!

    • case and PSU
    • mSATA/SSD
    • cpu cooler
    • RAM
      = ~1300 € and no power saving but much more power!


  • Thanks for your input,

    I'm still more interested in the DIY route using the parts I've already decided on, or the other platform I linked recently.
    Vastly cheaper once once does the currency conversion & includes shipping costs…
    Sure that doesn't include support but I'm fine with that, we've already had that discussion in great detail previously.
    The alt. platform (Xeon_D) I referenced most recently is very unlikely at this stage, I'll finalise my decision on that later.

    I need to know a tonne of practical/real-world examples of what I can do with the Xeon_D that I can't with the C2758.
    That'll help me decide if I want to bother with it. If you can offer some examples -that'd be much appreciated.*
    If none of them of them are compelling (once I understand them all), then I'm best-off going with the weaker but less power-hungry C2758.
    If at least one of them is compelling, then I'll have to decide if it's compelling enough to justify the extra power consumption & cost.

    Cheers.
    *do note that I have plans for a separate NAS build, which I intend to be much more powerful than this build



  • do note that I have plans for a separate NAS build, which I intend to be much more powerful than this build

    Why? The Xeon D platform is able to handle 128 GB ECC RAM instead of the Xeon E3 with 32 GB and USB 3.0 is also
    given to realize FreeNAS on an USB Stick and Backup the NAS with an external USB 3.0 RDX drive, and this also very
    fast! A Xeon E3-1231v3 is for ~200 € and a sufficient Board is for ~250 € enough to take all load from a full featured
    pfSense 2.2.3 as I see it right.

    Supermicro D1540 Board
    Supermicro FreeNAS
    DGS1510-20 - 10 GBit/s Switch



  • Because I want an "appliance" like situation there*, I'll likely be buying a QNAP.
    One of the the very pricey RU's they have available for SMB+…

    So given that, would you suggest I go back to C2758 for my fw/gw/router build?

    *at least initially



  • So given that, would you suggest I go back to C2758 for my fw/gw/router build?

    Not so easy to answer!
    For highly usage, Power usage or users, many installed and running packets like snort, squid & squid guard
    the C2758 would be wonderful enough but only on top strange VPN connections compared with urgent needed
    high throughput I would go by an Xeon E3.

    I'll likely be buying a QNAP

    Ok for sure if the Supermicro Board and miniITX case is not sufficient enough it would be a hint
    or if the 4 drive bays are not enough no problem. But,

    • Supermicro D-1540 Board has a PCIe slot for an real RAID Controller
    • 2 x USB 3.0 for USB & fast Backup options
    • up to 128 GB of ECC RAM
    • 8 Cores and 16 HT cores
    • able to insert a DVD/BlueRay Player/Burner

    This is all not given at QNAP and the real SMB+ NAS devices are not cheap, but not offering those options to you!
    I don´t want to say do this or this, sleep about and think about, only you would be able to know what you really
    want to do and what you really urgent need! A complete C2758 Platform from Supermicro is here in Germany where
    I am able to buy a

    • C2758 board for ~350 €
    • a miniITX case for ~90 €
    • RAM 8 GB ECC 120 €
    • SATADOM 64 GB for ~70 €

    This is all for 630 €! And you will buy a D-1540 Board only for something around ~900 € - 1000 €!

    So I really thing it is overkill, or I did not understand your needs, this is also able.



  • Yeah I think I'll stick with the C2758 on the fw/gw/router build, Xeon's overkill when I'll already have another powerful CPU (not Xeon OOTB IIRC -but easily upgraded) in my NAS appliance.

    I don't have time to go into detail about all of my projects (plus it's off-topic here), just know that I have several "on the boil"; a dedicated NAS appliance, a dedicated HEPC/PVR build etc.

    The latter's mostly done a few yrs back, just some minor upgrades to do…

    Thanks for the input, BR/Night.



  • @Jason:

    Raw throughput and quoted IOPS on a consumer drive are not factors in a SSD purchase for a server.  The DC S3500 is an (entry) enterprise drive and has power loss protection, consistent performance under multi-user workloads, and a higher endurance rating.  The first is extremely important for any server, the latter two can have a big impact if you're using something like Squid.

    Not to mention it's bloody cheap for a server drive!
    I currently even use the 80 GB DC S3500 for new client computers. If you're going to spend 800 euro, why not invest in a SSD which will start up tomorrow?

    This link has most of the information: http://lkcl.net/reports/ssd_analysis.html

    ontopic:
    Funny thing is I assembled a system myself, and only then viewed the pfSense shop. I have almost exactly the same build as their C2758 1U platform. I used the SuperMicro A1SRi-2558F, which is the same, but with a 4-core processor instead of an 8-core.
    Of course I would like to have that Xeon-D motherboard, but that thing's bloody expensive! With this atom board I finally have a board that's cheap enough for home use. Small businesses up to 25 to 50 people would be fine too with that atom. At my work the pfSense router is an 'ancient' Sun Fire v60x (which is actually an rebadged intel board and chassis), it has a single socket 604 xeon 2.8 GHz (gallatin?), and that thing still handles everything.

    The only drawback of the SC505 chassis used in that build is that the power supply sucks donkeyballs. At least mine does. I still have to send it back. It makes a lot of noise. The A1SRi-2558F can run from 12 V, which I intend to do. This way it can run of my main server and benefit from the power supply efficiency and double power supplies from that thing.

    In my opinion, for home use you don't need much more. Small business might benefit from an old clunky server here and there. I don't think you can virtualise a router. Everything else can run off your primary server. Some tasks might be better to delegate to an old server. But for home use that uses too much power and space, in my opinion.

    Uhh.. what were we talking about? I don't know anymore… send me beer monies!

    edit:
    @BlueKobold:

    • Supermicro D-1540 Board has a PCIe slot for an real RAID Controller

    Who in their right mind is going to use a RAID controller these days on FreeBSD with ZFS?



  • @SisterOfMercy:

    The only drawback of the SC505 chassis used in that build is that the power supply sucks donkeyballs. At least mine does. I still have to send it back. It makes a lot of noise. The A1SRi-2558F can run from 12 V, which I intend to do. This way it can run of my main server and benefit from the power supply efficiency and double power supplies from that thing.

    Yes, if the only thing you're saying sux is the PSU noise, SPCR made note of that in their review, not a big deal for me as it'll be in our isolated & large storage room.

    But I wasn't a fan of the PSU output, was hoping for one that's much less than 200w (because one will rarely -if ever- hit the efficiency sweetspot with such a high wattage), but apparently they're very hard to come by.

    Do you think it's possible to run my proposed build off of my NAS's PSU?* I haven't yet settled on exactly which QNAP RU model I'm getting, so I should probably suspend this Qn until I know the answer to that!

    Cheers.
    *if I go that route perhaps I'll ensure the model I buy has a redundant PSU -or the option to add one



  • @jalyst:

    Yes, if the only thing you're saying sux is the PSU noise, SPCR made note of that in their review, not a big deal for me as it'll be in our isolated & large storage room.

    It's not fan noise. It seems to be possessed, it 'screams'. I don't hope it's supposed to do that.

    @jalyst:

    Do you think it's possible to run my proposed build off of my NAS's PSU?* I haven't yet settled on exactly which QNAP RU model I'm getting, so I should probably suspend this Qn until I know the answer to that!

    Probably, you only need 12 V. But you do have to make a few wires of your own, or get a really long P4-plug extension. And if that QNAP thing has a spare P4 plug or a spare 5,25" drive connector you should be set.



  • @SisterOfMercy:

    It's not fan noise. It seems to be possessed, it 'screams'. I don't hope it's supposed to do that.

    In the SPCR review they put the noise down to the tiny fan, but maybe there's some other problem with your PSU:
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1383-page6.html

    Probably, you only need 12 V. But you do have to make a few wires of your own, or get a really long P4-plug extension. And if that QNAP thing has a spare P4 plug or a spare 5,25" drive connector you should be set.

    Is there a step-by-step tutorial of this somewhere, or have you seen someone document how to do it? (ideally with a Fw/Router build + NAS that's very similar to mine)

    Thank-you.



  • Coming back to this for the first time in ages
    Had a bunch of personal stuff go down with friends/family, so this & related projects had to hit the back burner :'(
    Coming back to it now, & for the life of me, I can't find this damn model any more?!?
    http://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-FTN4.cfm

    I see pfSense now offer 2 successor models, I think they still basically use the same MB/SoC (could be wrong):
    https://store.pfsense.org/C2758/
    Has C7258 been superseded by something even better, or is it still the best option for my intended use?*
    I haven't exhausted all avenues, but so far I can't find it locally for a good price, & Amazon don't ship to Australia any more!

    Here's the other 3 Supermicro C7258 models, they're basically identical motherboards, with slight differences in chassis;
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-MHN4.cfm
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-TN7B.cfm
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018A-TN4.cfm

    I may consider one of their Xeon-D models, but only if they're marginally pricier:
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018D-LN4T.cfm
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/1018/SYS-1018D-FRN8T.cfm
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018D-FN8T.cfm
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/system/1U/5018/SYS-5018D-FN4T.cfm

    Maybe 1 of the 8 models above are available somewhere locally for a good price, or OS for an even better price + decent shipping?
    Amongst the 4x C7258 based bare-bones units listed above, 5018A-FTN4 was my preferred option.
    But I can't find it for a good price OS or locally yet, if anyone else can, can you please advise?
    Else, maybe you can see some good deals for one of the other models listed above!?!

    N.B.
    I have to double-check this, but I'm pretty sure our Internet connection (Cable) won't be faster than 105MBPS any time soon.

    Thank-you.
    *dedicated FW/Router/DNS/Proxy/Filter/QoS/VPN etc + pfSense  (may put pfSense on top of a hypervisor YTBFD)



  • I hand built this system if your interested. Runs like a champ, never had any issues and don't come anywhere close to working it hard on our home network (250/10). I run Snort, Squid/Squid Block, Squid Antivirus as well.

    Supermicro 2758 motherboard
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Atom/X10/A1SRi-2758F.cfm

    Supermicro 505 1U chasis
    https://www.supermicro.com/products/chassis/1u/505/sc505-203.cfm

    Kingston 8gb DDR3 ram (x2)

    Samsung 850 EVO 12gb SSD

    Evercool fans x2

    Supermicro 2.5in HDD bracket



  • @jalyst:

    Why didn't you go for one of their bare-bones units I linked in my post above?

    I pieced things together by waiting for sales prices, and more importantly I like to tinker ;)



  • How about this???
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01FX8TXUQ
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/10689/gigabyte-gbbsi7hal6500-dual-lan-skylake-brix-review

    At least it bloody ships here & is readily available locally, instead of via "specialised cloak & dagger" resellers etc!
    Seems a bit excessive for what I'm wanting to focus it towards, & I really want more flexibility/expandability.
    Wanted the ability to have at least 3 WAN interfaces, failing over, or even aggregating/LB occasionally.

    Or maybe even this???
    https://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-Barebone-i3-6100U-Graphic-GB-BSi3HAL-6100/dp/B01GSTYXWM

    I hate the form-factor of both, I wanted something that'd go into the Rack I'm also installing >.>
    But if it's better in every way than the Rangeley & Xeon-D units I was eyeing;*
    Then considering how much cheaper & more accessible it is, then maybe it's the way to go?

    TBH, I still don't know enough about all 3 CPU/MB & all the areas in which they differ, trying to read that now.
    Where do these 2 models fall down, compared to the bare-bones units I originally had my heart set on?

    EDIT
    I guess if I need more than 1 WAN port, I could always use the built-in USB3? e.g:
    http://www.virtuallyghetto.com/2016/03/functional-usb-3-0-ethernet-adapter-nic-driver-for-esxi-5-5-6-0.html
    And there's PCIe IIRC, though not sure it'd be optimal for adding 1 or more Gbe port?
    Given I've a separate -much more powerful- build coming, I probably won't bother w.a Hypervisor for this config.
    I may play a bit, but longer term probably not…

    *except expandability & power-consumption presumably



  • Regarding

    http://www.wiredzone.com/supermicro-servers-compact-embedded-processor-sys-e300-8d-10026325?urlsource=tinkertry

    I'm not an expert on pfSense performance etc… however comparing brix i7-6500 vs the xeon 1518 I'd argue that the Xeon has more Cores/threads which will outperform the i7 (which has a higher clock frequency).

    The SuperMicro system also has 6 onboard gigabit NICs + 2 x 10Gb Nics.

    It's probably overkill, but I would run esxi and share the resources. E.g. Run a plex media server on the same hardware. You could also run FreeNAS.



  • Yeah, I'm not sure how exactly that particular Xeon-d + Mobo compares with the Brix systems I highlighted;
    It's handy having the 4 Gbe ports I require (at least) OOTB, but more WAN/LAN interfaces can be added to the Brix units via USB3/PCIe.
    I don't care about 10Gbe for this build, where the device is placed it won't be used. Hmm…
    Still need to know much more about how the CPU/MB's compare for the Ranglesy, i-U, & Xeon-D bare-bones units I'm eyeing.
    Not interested in this build being a "NAS" or Media Server", have separate builds under way for that…



  • This is the mainboard used in the E300 system:

    http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Xeon/D/X10SDV-TP8F.cfm

    The SuperMicro is a Server grade Mainboard while the Brix is a Desktop/Consumer grade mainboard.

    I understand about not needing 10GB Nic, but at almost the same price as the birx its a nice to have.



  • Yeah, read this thread from at least here onwards (interesting read for anyone looking into all of this stuff):
    http://www.snbforums.com/threads/recommendations-for-discrete-gw-fw-etc-router.24343/page-3#post-281888
    At one point, one of the posters suggested a similar motherboard…
    Pretty much settled back on C7258, def. keeping Xeon-D & Others on the radar for a sep. NAS/jack-of-all build!

    BR.

    EDIT
    Hmm, I just came across this on the pfSense forum:
    https://forum.pfsense.org/index.php?topic=88774.0
    That's the MB that comes with the bare-bones unit I'm probably buying.
    Should this be something I care about? In what circumstances?

    Nvm, in that thread a recent poster has confirmed it's been fixed -in a newer version of pfSense.


Log in to reply