Firewall / Rules / Edit Page : Cancel Button Missing



  • 2.3-ALPHA (amd64)
    built on Fri Oct 09 14:00:14 CDT 2015
    FreeBSD 10.2-STABLE

    On the "Firewall / Rules / Edit" page, the cancel button is missing.

    Regards,
    ![Screenshot from 2015-10-09 23:11:54.jpg](/public/imported_attachments/1/Screenshot from 2015-10-09 23:11:54.jpg)
    ![Screenshot from 2015-10-09 23:11:54.jpg_thumb](/public/imported_attachments/1/Screenshot from 2015-10-09 23:11:54.jpg_thumb)



  • The cancel buttons were removed in favor of just using the back button in your browser, as that's quicker than scrolling down and finding Cancel, many of the ones that existed before didn't work consistently anyway, and there's no harm in just going back. We didn't see much point in keeping them. There some reason we missed that it's desirable? Thanks for the feedback.



  • Excellent ! Thank You For The Great Work !



  • Hi

    that's quicker than scrolling down and finding Cancel

    It depends the place on that particular page you are and decide to go back. This new design occupies twice the space of the old one. And like good web designers do they put the controls on the bottom and on top, like pagination controls and other stuff.

    many of the ones that existed before didn't work consistently anyway

    You have using javascript to go back on history? a button with the link of the parent page is difficult to program? You have the path on the top should not be difficult. Would be cool to have a arrow to go to the top in different locations of the page if is relevant, at least.

    Thanks



  • @mais_um:

    You have using javascript to go back on history? a button with the link of the parent page is difficult to program?

    Not difficult, but there are 200+ pages so even trivial things get time consuming, and why bother? Alt+right arrow or back button on your mouse, or even clicking back in your browser if you must, is a lot quicker regardless of where you are on the page.



  • Well, back button in the browser behaves differently than loading the preivous page from scratch. Using back button (depending on how the pages are programmed) can show the previous page with all forms filled in or selected as the user did earlier, which may not be desirable (especially when the user is troubleshooting or not sure what to select, etc.).

    Having a separate "Cancel" button was useful to make sure that the user can abandon/restart the current workflow without any side effects, making 100% sure that possible mistakes made on the previous pages are all wiped out.



  • @robi:

    Well, back button in the browser behaves differently than loading the preivous page from scratch. Using back button (depending on how the pages are programmed) can show the previous page with all forms filled in or selected as the user did earlier, which may not be desirable (especially when the user is troubleshooting or not sure what to select, etc.).

    Having a separate "Cancel" button was useful to make sure that the user can abandon/restart the current workflow without any side effects, making 100% sure that possible mistakes made on the previous pages are all wiped out.

    This is the big reason I would agree with this.
    And I definitely have been bit (not on pfsense) by form/session data preserved by hitting back that wouldn't be if there was a fresh page load.
    Another reason is that sometimes a back button can bring you back to a redirect page and you'll just end up in a loop, especially on mobile devices which may not be as graceful.

    I always use a cancel button or breadcrumb link when available rather than hitting back.



  • @cmb:

    The cancel buttons were removed in favor of just using the back button in your browser, as that's quicker than scrolling down and finding Cancel, many of the ones that existed before didn't work consistently anyway, and there's no harm in just going back. We didn't see much point in keeping them. There some reason we missed that it's desirable? Thanks for the feedback.

    I would like too say that I see two reasons for keeping a Cancel button.
    The first a well known behavior with most other software products, If I press Cancel I have made the choice to abort. If I just go back - well some software/pages saves directly upon leaving a field in the form

    The second is the same as others have stated. Back isn't as reliable as it should be

    Just my thoughts on this



  • Yep… and relying on the browser's functionality (in this case "Back" button functionality) is risky, what happens if for some reason browsers get some updates changing the way Back button works...?
    We've seen things like this happen quite a few times in the past...


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