Stuck Beacon. Sigh…



  • I attempted to switch from ipfire to pfSense over the weekend.  For the most part, everything was a success and I was happy with the install and configuration.  Not until my kids came home did I realize there was an issue with WiFi.  I am using a Compex WLE200N2-23 (Atheros AR9283) card which worked great under ipfire.  Upon logging in to the pfsense serial interface I realized the WiFi issues were a result of the dreaded stuck beacons which I figured would be resolved in 2.2.5, but apparently not.  I have read several ways to get around this, but did not have time to implement as my family was melting without internet.  So, back to ipfire I went…

    Do the developers foresee actually fixing this issue?  It appears to be driver related, so perhaps nothing can be done pfsense side.  I figured by 2.2.5 and a newer version of OpenBSD would have addressed this, but I guess not.  Perhaps moving to another card is the answer.

    Very frustrating as I like the pfsense project, interface and all other aspects!


  • Banned

    Get a proper AP. Connect it to a switch. Problem fixed. No need to switch your firewalls for this.

    I wish the wifi crap was completely removed from pfSense. FreeBSD completely sucks for wifi, just silly waste of developers time.



  • I hear you and yes I get it.  However, this is certainly a nice feature and not worth abandoning!  AP with integrated WiFi card works flawlessly in ipfire…



  • @bikemike:

    I attempted to switch from ipfire to pfSense over the weekend.  For the most part, everything was a success and I was happy with the install and configuration.  Not until my kids came home did I realize there was an issue with WiFi.  I am using a Compex WLE200N2-23 (Atheros AR9283) card which worked great under ipfire.  Upon logging in to the pfsense serial interface I realized the WiFi issues were a result of the dreaded stuck beacons which I figured would be resolved in 2.2.5, but apparently not.  I have read several ways to get around this, but did not have time to implement as my family was melting without internet.  So, back to ipfire I went…

    Do the developers foresee actually fixing this issue?  It appears to be driver related, so perhaps nothing can be done pfsense side.  I figured by 2.2.5 and a newer version of OpenBSD would have addressed this, but I guess not.  Perhaps moving to another card is the answer.

    Very frustrating as I like the pfsense project, interface and all other aspects!

    does ipfire supports n/ac standards ?

    what makes you shift to pfsense that is not present in ipfire ?
    i tried few atheros cards and they are working fien and i am connected at 68Mbps..
    and it has 4 ssids.. pfsene/bsd doesnt support n/ac standard..
    look at my thread about which cards i used..

    they were extracted by scrap dealers from dead laptops and i got them for 2 USD each..



  • ipfire supports 802.11g/n without any issue or at least that is what I am set at.  I have no issues with integrated WiFi using ipfire.  Most of my connections are around 130mb or less.  So, not quite N.  This is more than enough to support what we do.

    I find the ipfire interface a bit unrefined with some odd behavior in certain areas .  pfsense is simply more mature and is much more refined with the ability for more advanced features, etc.  Plus, I wanted to try something new  :)  The pfsense is much more intuitive and simply makes sense.

    For some reason, pfsense does not like the Atheros AR9283 chipset.  Being close to the access point, things worked.  Being further away, the signal strength was good, but the mass frequency of stuck beacons were too much for things like facetime, etc.  Changing channels reduced the beacon errors, but not enough for a reliable connection at distance.

    In short, I simply like pfsense better, but ipfire worked without much tinkering after the fact.  Looks like an external AP may be the way to go here unfortunately.



  • @bikemike:

    ipfire supports 802.11g/n without any issue or at least that is what I am set at.  I have no issues with integrated WiFi using ipfire.  Most of my connections are around 130mb or less.  So, not quite N.  This is more than enough to support what we do.

    I find the ipfire interface a bit unrefined with some odd behavior in certain areas .  pfsense is simply more mature and is much more refined with the ability for more advanced features, etc.  Plus, I wanted to try something new  :)  The pfsense is much more intuitive and simply makes sense.

    For some reason, pfsense does not like the Atheros AR9283 chipset.  Being close to the access point, things worked.  Being further away, the signal strength was good, but the mass frequency of stuck beacons were too much for things like facetime, etc.  Changing channels reduced the beacon errors, but not enough for a reliable connection at distance.

    In short, I simply like pfsense better, but ipfire worked without much tinkering after the fact.  Looks like an external AP may be the way to go here unfortunately.

    yes external are aweseome..

    you can buy an tplink i am using tlwr740v1.1 since it came out . and its still running great .. i have loaded it with ddwrt and using it as ap so it is just a connecting point for my clients all other things are forwarded to pfsense..
    it hardly costs 15 USD


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