Coming soon: PCI Express VDSL Card



  • The VigorNIC 132 is a full function DSL router firewall on a PCI express for inserting directly inside your server or PC. The use of a PCI card reduces your rackspace footprint, cabling and power consumption.  The VigorNIC132 is ideal for single servers, IP PBX applications or any other application where your server needs direct WAN access.

    Check the manufacturer web for more info

    http://www.draytek.co.uk/products/business/vigornic-132


  • Netgate Administrator

    Hmm, novel with the SFP port.

    Steve



  • Might be ideal to insert a modem as PCIe card into a pfSense firewall, so no extra modem at the
    outside is needed. Cool device.



  • I hope this works out with pfSense (OS Support FreeBSD is stated) and is cheaper, so i can remove the DrayTek Vigor 130 from my buy list.
    Did i read correct that it only supports 100Mbit bi-directional?



  • Couldn't find it in the details but the host facing part could be your run of the mill Ethernet NIC which would explain the support for FreeBSD.



  • @kpa:

    Couldn't find it in the details but the host facing part could be your run of the mill Ethernet NIC which would explain the support for FreeBSD.

    From what I can gather it's essentially one of their modem/router combos on a PCI-E card and present itsself as an ethernet interface to the host PC.

    The SFP one is apperently project order only according to their UK site, the regular one will have an RJ11 for ADSL2/VDSL2 and an RJ45 for an ethernet wan, and supports ~150Mbit/s throughput which is probably fine for most people here as lets face it if you are using it with pfSense you probably bought it for the DSL modem and will be operating it in bridge mode.

    No Idea if the Ethernet WAN port could also be bridged.



  • Thanks for this link-  New stuff to play with.  ;D


  • Netgate Administrator

    @dragon2611:

    From what I can gather it's essentially one of their modem/router combos on a PCI-E card and present itsself as an ethernet interface to the host PC.

    That's what it looks like to me too. Essentially a V130 on a PCIe card. It will appear as an Ethernet card to pfSense. Be nice if it wasn't Realtek….. but it's probably Realtek.  ;)

    For use with pfSense you would want to run it bridged. I've not used a V130 but the V120 I used for years is bridged by default, I don't think this card will be though so some configuration would be required.

    Steve



  • That's amazing I love it! Can we get one for DOCSIS 3/3.1??



  • @stephenw10:

    @dragon2611:

    From what I can gather it's essentially one of their modem/router combos on a PCI-E card and present itsself as an ethernet interface to the host PC.

    That's what it looks like to me too. Essentially a V130 on a PCIe card. It will appear as an Ethernet card to pfSense. Be nice if it wasn't Realtek….. but it's probably Realtek.  ;)

    For use with pfSense you would want to run it bridged. I've not used a V130 but the V120 I used for years is bridged by default, I don't think this card will be though so some configuration would be required.

    Steve

    It is indeed a Realtek, as I've just got my hands on one.  It's also on 192.168.2.1 not 192.168.1.1 as the QSG would have you believe and may need a firmware update to enable bridging of VDSL2.

    My Proxmox host sees it as "Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller" in LSPCI and references r8169 in dmesg when bringing the nic up/down.

    DSL modem side appears to be Infineon, with latest firmware it works in bridge ok not sure about as an actual router though as the release notes seem to suggest that might be broken.  :o

    Syncs at around 65/16.5 with the broadcom DSLAM my line is connected to, was getting around 67/18 with the broadcom modem previously.



  • I have a setup in mind: 2× VigorNIC 320 acting as VDSL2 modems for 2 different ISPs configured for load balancing and an Ethernet with 4 ports for the router itself. Would that be possible with pfSense?



  • It may lower the latencies, but it also expose you hardware to electric shock from the phone line. Also VDSl scales much higher than 250mbps, doesn't seems so shining after all.



  • @Limbi:

    It may lower the latencies, but it also expose you hardware to electric shock from the phone line. Also VDSl scales much higher than 250mbps, doesn't seems so shining after all.

    That's unlikely. Any EU or not-third-world country has rules on how to connect and get approval for phone lines, and nearly all of it means MOV's, Y-class caps, and often galvanic separation. No shocks there!



  • @johnkeates:

    @Limbi:

    It may lower the latencies, but it also expose you hardware to electric shock from the phone line. Also VDSl scales much higher than 250mbps, doesn't seems so shining after all.

    That's unlikely. Any EU or not-third-world country has rules on how to connect and get approval for phone lines, and nearly all of it means MOV's, Y-class caps, and often galvanic separation. No shocks there!

    Except when you live in the rural areas (I don't) lightning shocks can still damage equipment connected to the phone lines, I've seen it happen on systems that had multiple levels of protection by galvanic separation and other safety measures.



  • @kpa:

    @johnkeates:

    @Limbi:

    It may lower the latencies, but it also expose you hardware to electric shock from the phone line. Also VDSl scales much higher than 250mbps, doesn't seems so shining after all.

    That's unlikely. Any EU or not-third-world country has rules on how to connect and get approval for phone lines, and nearly all of it means MOV's, Y-class caps, and often galvanic separation. No shocks there!

    Except when you live in the rural areas (I don't) lightning shocks can still damage equipment connected to the phone lines, I've seen it happen on systems that had multiple levels of protection by galvanic separation and other safety measures.

    Wouldn't that damage via power lines, simple nearby conductivity and ethernet cables as well?



  • @johnkeates:

    Except when you live in the rural areas (I don't) lightning shocks can still damage equipment connected to the phone lines, I've seen it happen on systems that had multiple levels of protection by galvanic separation and other safety measures.

    Wouldn't that damage via power lines, simple nearby conductivity and ethernet cables as well?

    Possible but buffered. And that can make all the difference.

    We build and maintain radio sites that get struck pretty regularly. You pretty much know right away if you did it wrong. There are some pretty impressive telco line protectors out there yet we loose more telco equipment in our shacks than anything else.



  • @dragon2611:

    @stephenw10:

    @dragon2611:

    From what I can gather it's essentially one of their modem/router combos on a PCI-E card and present itsself as an ethernet interface to the host PC.

    That's what it looks like to me too. Essentially a V130 on a PCIe card. It will appear as an Ethernet card to pfSense. Be nice if it wasn't Realtek….. but it's probably Realtek.  ;)

    For use with pfSense you would want to run it bridged. I've not used a V130 but the V120 I used for years is bridged by default, I don't think this card will be though so some configuration would be required.

    Steve

    It is indeed a Realtek, as I've just got my hands on one.  It's also on 192.168.2.1 not 192.168.1.1 as the QSG would have you believe and may need a firmware update to enable bridging of VDSL2.

    My Proxmox host sees it as "Ethernet controller: Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller" in LSPCI and references r8169 in dmesg when bringing the nic up/down.

    DSL modem side appears to be Infineon, with latest firmware it works in bridge ok not sure about as an actual router though as the release notes seem to suggest that might be broken.  :o

    Syncs at around 65/16.5 with the broadcom DSLAM my line is connected to, was getting around 67/18 with the broadcom modem previously.

    Did you manage to use in bridge mode in pfsense? If not, which OS did you try on?


  • Netgate Administrator

    If it's not in bridge mode it should just appear as a router connected to a Realtek NiC. It shouldn't matter what OS the host is running as long as it supports that NIC.

    Steve



  • On top of that: it's not a "VDSL modem for pfSense", it's a modem on top of a network card, no different from a standalone modem with an ethernet connection. You cannot configure it from pfSense, you cannot make a 'direct' connection and you can't do anything DSL-related with it. You still have to log in to the interface on the modem itself, change the settings there, and still manage it separately.

    The only difference is that it's installed inside the system instead of in it's own box.



  • @johnkeates:

    On top of that: it's not a "VDSL modem for pfSense", it's a modem on top of a network card, no different from a standalone modem with an ethernet connection. You cannot configure it from pfSense, you cannot make a 'direct' connection and you can't do anything DSL-related with it. You still have to log in to the interface on the modem itself, change the settings there, and still manage it separately.

    The only difference is that it's installed inside the system instead of in it's own box.

    Does it mean I need to physically plug the ethernet port of the vdsl card back into another ethernet port for pfsense for example to use PPPOE?


  • Netgate Administrator

    No.

    The Realtek NIC on the 'modem' card is connected to the host via PCIe just as a separate NIC would be.

    Steve