Patch panel test



  • Hi all!
    Tomorrow I will test patch panel installation to wall sockets… Do you think its enough to test it with iperf and 2 clients or should I also test it with cable tester? Its 120 ports so I wouldnt like to test them with both methods :)
    Thanks!



  • i wouldn't bother with iperf ….

    if you know the length doesn't exceed 90 meters & it checks out with a simple cable tester, then its more then likely OK. If there are trouble afterwards, rent a Fluke DTX (or whatever is available) to measure the db loss on the cable & print a certificate.



  • @heper:

    if you know the length doesn't exceed 90 meters & it checks out with a simple cable tester, then its more then likely OK. If there are trouble afterwards, rent a Fluke DTX (or whatever is available) to measure the db loss on the cable & print a certificate.

    This is true, but I might still iperf or similar to push a lot of large packets across and check error counters on the switch port and connected device's NIC if you don't have a good cable tester (beyond the simple "yeah the pins are connected"). A proper Fluke-like higher end cable tester should detect any issues. If you don't have one, then iperf or anything that generates a lot of large packets will help confirm it's a stable link. Small packets may not trigger cabling issues where large ones will.



  • Thanks guys, iperf it is…
    30 seconds in both directions... Pizza and beer on the job 😊



  • Just curious, what hardware will you use on both ends? Im guessing pfSense on the one end, maybe a laptop on the other? Walk it around to the various endpoints?

    Im going to start pulling wires in my home soon and will need to be doing this test as well..



  • If it's CAT5e, the "devices" test is often very adequate.
    One thing to watch out for: make sure you're doing a Gigabit connection.
    100Mb connections only need 2 pairs, while 1000Mb on modern devices uses all 4 pairs.

    Cat6 verification to "Manufacturers specs and performance" is a different kettle of fish and requires a dedicated tester.

    All that said, I did quick and dirty Go/NoGo tests for years using a Gigabit switch at the patch panel and a smaller switch carried around to the wall jacks.
    Patch all the ports you can at the panel and walk around testing for "green light" at the wall jack when you plug in the other switch.
    Worked very well at identifying miswiring and even some poor connections.

    Finally broke down and bough a dedicated tester to give me lengths, specs and an indication of "What's wrong" when things go bad.



  • FWIW: you might also want to check out the switch in place (if there is one already installed or at hand)
    Some of them have wire diagnostic tests onboard… (most Cisco's do, even the SMB series)



  • I've just completed tests… I let 2-3gb trough each port :)
    Found 5 faulty on walls...


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