SOHO Use: Squid: SSD or HDD?



  • For a SOHO deployment: 30 end-devices on average, what is the best bang per buck? I currently use an old 250GB 3.5" drive but I would rather replace it before it fails to not have to deal with downtime. Would a "cheap" SSD be a good option? I do use squid, but with only 30 devices on the network, is it being written to to the extent that using an SSD is still ill-advised?



  • unless you have a spare old hd, use a 120-256gb ssd


  • Banned

    If you're already using it then you know what your capacity needs are already, don't buy more than you need. You can get pretty small SSDs and I'm doubting you can effectively use anything near 120GB with squid at home.

    Even cheap modern SSDs are not that write sensitive. They'll be fine for you.

    If you are really concerned about writes you can mitigate with a RAM disk but I doubt it's necessary for home use.



  • I would have to agree with the above. Even with a 10GB cache a small 60GB SSD would have a ton of room for wear leveling. You should expect years of service with all but the worst SSDs.



  • SSDs are speeding much if you are using the squid as a caching proxy and the cheapest one that are supporting TRIM
    would be better then spinning and much more heat producing HDDs. The best bet can not so easily suggested to you
    pending on what your are all caching or not, I mean that you will be happy with 60 GB but with 120 GB you will be
    absolutely on the safe side.



  • I don't think it's been said yet in this thread, but the number one tip would be to not use squid at all. Regardless of the drive, it'll slow things down for very little gain.


  • Banned

    @VAMike:

    I don't think it's been said yet in this thread, but the number one tip would be to not use squid at all. Regardless of the drive, it'll slow things down for very little gain.

    Agreed, I setup squid first thing when I got a pfSense box because it sounds really great. In actuality it's (IMO) way more ass pain than it's worth. You have to do a MITM attack on all of your clients to work with HTTPS, which is becoming the standard. About the only thing I know of that you can do on squid with both HTTP and HTTPS without mitm is log the base URL's people are going to.

    That being said if you have a real reason to use squid then you probably already know the issues you'll have to overcome.



  • i use squid+squidguard + snort

    really old 250gb sata hd. no issues