QoS by Port



  • Having read around after installing pfsense I might be disappointed that I can't do the following…

    I used to do on Tomato firmware something like

    Top = priority (Up/Down bandwidth limits)

    Facetime/Skype (90-100%)
    HTTP (75-100%)
    Crashplan (5-99%)
    Undefined (1-90%)
    Lowest (1-10%) - E.g. P2P.

    Using the wizard I get limited to 53Mbit of 220Mbit!? (25%!?)

    Trying to adjust the limits it complains about being > 100%, and the shared box is ticked.

    I've spent about 4 hours trying to work this out with absolutely no success.

    One of the reasons I went down the pfSense route rather than a faster Asus router (RT-N66U couldn't do 220/22 AND QoS) was decent QoS, however from reading around this evening suggests this incredibly powerful piece of software can't do something I could do on a consumer router?

    Is what I used to be able to do possible on pfSense?

    Thanks  :)



  • @TDKL2017:

    Having read around after installing pfsense I might be disappointed that I can't do the following…

    I used to do on Tomato firmware something like

    Top = priority (Up/Down bandwidth limits)

    Facetime/Skype (90-100%)
    HTTP (75-100%)
    Crashplan (5-99%)
    Undefined (1-90%)
    Lowest (1-10%) - E.g. P2P.

    Using the wizard I get limited to 53Mbit of 220Mbit!? (25%!?)

    Trying to adjust the limits it complains about being > 100%, and the shared box is ticked.

    I've spent about 4 hours trying to work this out with absolutely no success.

    One of the reasons I went down the pfSense route rather than a faster Asus router (RT-N66U couldn't do 220/22 AND QoS) was decent QoS, however from reading around this evening suggests this incredibly powerful piece of software can't do something I could do on a consumer router?

    Is what I used to be able to do possible on pfSense?

    Thanks  :)

    There's obviously a problem. The QoS functions fine for the majority of users.

    Skip the wizard and create your queues manually, keeping it as simple as possible. Then create the corresponding firewall rules and assign the traffic to your queues.

    I notice that your combined percentages don't equal 100%, which is kinda strange. The traffic-shaping may not end up working like you expect with your current percentages.



  • The QoS on the tomato firmware (rather than AsusWRT) worked in a way that if nothing else is using the bandwidth that it can use up to the maximum limit.

    But if everything is trying to use the bandwidth it tries to ensure that the higher priorities get at-least the minimum.

    So overnight crashplan would use 99% of the upload capacity, but during the day if something else in the HTTP group was using the upload then it would drop to 5% and the other upload would get the other 95%.

    I'll have another go tonight.

    Thanks.



  • @TDKL2017:

    The QoS on the tomato firmware (rather than AsusWRT) worked in a way that if nothing else is using the bandwidth that it can use up to the maximum limit.

    But if everything is trying to use the bandwidth it tries to ensure that the higher priorities get at-least the minimum.

    So overnight crashplan would use 99% of the upload capacity, but during the day if something else in the HTTP group was using the upload then it would drop to 5% and the other upload would get the other 95%.

    I'll have another go tonight.

    Thanks.

    You'd need to read up on the details of the particular algorithm (HFSC, CBQ, FAIRQ, etc) you choose to see whether your configuration will work as you expect.

    Almost all algorithms allow unused bandwidth to be used. Some algorithms use "hard" numbers where bitrates/percentages must be exact while other algos use the numbers as a proportional guideline.



  • HFSC by default shares unused bandwidth. Bandwidth is always split among the queues based on their ratios of provisioned bandwidth. You can also place an upper limit such that a queue will never consume more than N amount.

    When working with HFSC, all bandwidth entered are based on "under load". How do you want your bandwidth distributed when all of the bandwidth is in use. Don't worry about anything else. Everything in use is the worst case. If you set it up correctly, your worst case will still be good, meaning your non-worst cases will be better.



  • To the OP… just curious did you ever have success on this? I'm also a former Tomato user....


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