Intel Pro/1000 MT Dual Gigabit PCIX Server NIC



  • are there any card better then this on a pci-port? i want to max troughput on a 1Ghz P3 celeron



  • In short - no.  Intel has been praised in the forums again and again for their server grade NICs.  That said, keep in mind the card you mentioned ( http://www.intel.com/products/server/adapters/pro1000mt/pro1000mt-overview.htm ) is PCI-X.  I doubt if your celeron MoBo can handle PCI-X.  Take a look at the picture and notice how long the connector on the card is.  PCI-X is a server standard and is different than PCI-Express.  Intel makes server cards for PCI-Express too, though.  Make sure you get what your system can handle.

    http://www.intel.com/network/connectivity/products/server_adapters.htm?iid=server_body+adapters#s1=Gigabit%20Ethernet&s2=all&s3=all



  • Just to clarify, the Intel dual GB PCI-X card will work in a standard PCI slot. It will just not be able to run at maximum performance.



  • Very interesting - I did not know that.  Is that true of most PCI-X equipment, or just selected hardware like the NIC in question?



  • In my experience, most PCI-X cards will run in standard PCI slots. Take that for what it's worth… The Intel card http://www.intel.com/products/server/adapters/pro1000mt-dualport/pro1000mt-dualport-overview.htm
    mentions that it will work in a 32 bit PCI slot explicitly in the features. I have used this card before because it will fit in both standard and low-profile slots. It's relatively expensive, but probably the best choice to add dual gig ports using a PCI or PCI-X slot.



  • im using an older dual port 1000mbit Intel PCI-X in pci-port now. om just wondering if a newer intel server card has better troughput on an older system



  • to clearify. will i get better troughput with Intel Pro/1000 MT Dual Gigabit PCIX Server NIC? im am now using:
    Portwell Intel ABN-172 Dual Port 10/100/1000 PCI-X Card

    thx



  • @http://www.pfsense.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=52&Itemid=49:

    Throughput Considerations

    If you require less than 10 Mbps of throughput, you can get by with the minimum requirements. For higher throughput requirements we recommend following these guidelines, based on our extensive testing and deployment experience. These guidelines offer a bit of breathing room because you never want to run your hardware to its full capacity.

    10-20 Mbps - No less than 266 MHz CPU
    21-50 Mbps - No less than 500 MHz CPU
    51-200 Mbps - No less than 1.0 GHz CPU
    201-500 Mbps - server class hardware with PCI-X or PCI-e network adapters, or newer desktop hardware with PCI-e network adapters. No less than 2.0 GHz CPU.
    501+ Mbps - server class hardware with PCI-X or PCI-e network adapters. No less than 3.0 GHz CPU.



  • i have 1Ghz cpu and 100% cpu load on my 100/20 line. before uppgrade to Freebsd 7 i had 70%max. så now im trying to find a way to get better troughput, thats why i wonder if there any better card then the one im using. only other way is to change celeron 1ghz to pentium 1ghz … but will it change speed much?
    ( im not using any packages only live-cd default)



  • In my opinion, that Celeron 1 GHz chip is really slowing you down.  I would definitely try a Pentium3 cpu if possible.  For best performance using the Intel Pro 1000 card, a cpu over 2 GHz or more would really push it nicely.

    Good luck!



  • The Intel PRO/1000MT Dual card uses the same chipset as your ABN-172, so I doubt you'll see a performance difference between the two. Sounds like your CPU is just underpowered, though the 'ifconfig link0' option might eeke out a little more performance. It doesn't seem to be enabled by default on my installs.

    For PCI-X in PCI slots, the specification says that it should always work, and in my experience it does, even with things like vendor-specific RAID cards designed for specific server chassis, so I think it's a fairly risk-free assumption, but there's a chance it won't work, as ever. One thing to watch out for is that there isn't always physical clearance behind the PCI slots for the 64-bit extension to hang over the edge. Make sure your motherboard doesn't have any capacitors or headers or anything like that using that space; many microATX boards seem to put things there (out of necessity, obviously).


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