Skype traffic shaping ?



  • AFAIK Skype uses random local ports and different remote ports when connecting to other peers.

    The PC where Skype is installed is being used as workstation, so I cannot shape the whole traffic flowing thru it. I don't consider using independent IP-enabled standalone skype phone. I'm using usb-connected phone which requires Skype app to be working all the time.

    Any suggestions how to shape skype traffic (ie. reserve some part of wan bandwidth for crack-free calls)?



  • You can tell skype a preferred port to use. Use this one then in your trafficshaper rules. Skype will only fall back to other ports if the preferred port is blocked or not available afaik. Also the lowdelay flag might be worth a try. Not sure if skype tags the packets with that flag though.



  • Nope… it's the other way around. You can configure fallback port (ie 80) in Skype - used when couldn't connect on random one.



  • Any ideas ????



  • Did you try the low delay setting?



  • I want to reserve bandwidth for skype. I cannot plan any options unless I am able to target skype's traffic.



  • If skype tags the packets as low delay it should catch that traffic.



  • Unfortunately protocols such as Skype are hard to classify as they port hop.

    Might be something we address down the road, it's definitely a common request.



  • I have mine working.

    In skype, you can specify the port you want to use. You also need to UNCHECK the "Allow fallback on port 80 and 443". Because even if you specify your own port and you have the proper NAT and firewall rules, Skype will still try and use 80 or 443 for some reason.

    From there, I setup the VoIP section in the Traffic Shaper to be Asterisk and I pointed it to my Skype PC's I.P. as well as filled in the port that I setup Skype with.

    Works well for me. I can see the VoIP queues being used when I use skype.

    Riley



  • Awesome.  This is good to know.

    But my comment still stands when your trying to shape Skype and you do not have control over their client (an ISP for example).



  • It doesn't help in any way. Skype configuration allows you to specify INCOMING connection port (as to configure proper port forwarding on router). It doesn't have anything to do with connecting out to the world. Shaping per IP is useless, as skype client is never the only net client on a pc workstation.

    Still not resolved. I'll be probably falling to some "real" voip solution, dumping skype (toy), as it is too problematic even in small business environment.



  • @joustin:

    It doesn't help in any way. Skype configuration allows you to specify INCOMING connection port (as to configure proper port forwarding on router). It doesn't have anything to do with connecting out to the world. Shaping per IP is useless, as skype client is never the only net client on a pc workstation.

    Still not resolved. I'll be probably falling to some "real" voip solution, dumping skype (toy), as it is too problematic even in small business environment.

    I tend to disagree.

    The port specification seems to work for the both because I can see skype in both my VoIP up AND down queues.

    If you are looking for a business-class service, then skype is definitely not what you're looking for anyways.

    Riley


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