Examples of Virtual IP usage?



  • Would someone be kind enough to share some illustrated examples of their Virtual IPs page? Thanks!



  • Here ya go.  Just changed the IP but is what Ive been using the last year…




  • @chpalmer:

    Here ya go.  Just changed the IP but is what Ive been using the last year…

    Hmm, what exactly do you use this feature for?

    Also, the Proxy ARP and the CARP – what exactly are those, and which would be most appropriate to choose?



  • I have a server running hmail, and wampserver hosting my company email and web page. I use 1:1 NAT in this instance.



  • @chpalmer:

    I have a server running hmail, and wampserver hosting my company email and web page. I use 1:1 NAT in this instance.

    So in the example illustration you provided, is that pfSense a separate machine from your hmail server and wamp server (are these one or two machines) or the same machine (virtualization involved, etc)?

    I am trying to figure out how it would be mapped. 12.34.56.78 would go to the pfSense machine based on how that looks, since you are assigning it to WAN.



  • I have a separate dedicated box for the pfSense router serving the network. Our provider supplies us one static IP and one provided via DHCP. (Commercial Cable Conn.)

    The server unit runs Windows Server 2008 and is dedicated to web, email, and a DB.



  • Consider the duty of the firewall- to keep people out of your network that dont belong trying to access it from the WAN.

    Now you have a webserver you want the world to see. In a simple configuration one might simply supply the server with a LAN address and plug it into their switch.

    Now unless there is a path from the WAN to the server, no one would ever see it… So you set up a port forward and a corresponding firewall rule to your server so that anyone using your IP (or DNS name if you have one i.e. pfsense.org) into their browser can see your webpage.

    Otherwise they would be stopped at the firewall.

    Too basic?



  • No, it makes sense. I'm just trying to see and understand the picture, and more importantly the how and why for specific little things. :) I appreciate your help, thanks! :D

    It sounds like you have 2 servers, one of which is strictly for pfSense and the other a Windows webserver (unless you correct me, I will assume it to be true). Do you have the pfSense server just give the webserver some 192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x IP, and ultimately just perform a simple port forward and so forth like one would do at home on their residential connection?

    If I am correct, it is that way. Your pfSense is the mouthpiece and messenger between your server and the internets. :]

    yay.



  • Sure-

    Off to a service call I go…    :)


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