Disk usage and Squid caching



  • Ok, have another question. I'm using squid to cache internet traffic to help reduce hit rates on the internet connection. I know, not really neaded but hey I have the machine to do it so why the heck not? Leaves more room for downloading other stuff.

    Anyhow, so I have a 160GB hard drive. My question is does PfSense use all of the drive or just a small amount. What I mean to say is does PfSense build a partition that partitions all of the avaliable space for usable space so that squid has lots of room to grow or is that something I need to somehow setup so that squid has lots of space to cache?



  • @Visseroth:

    Ok, have another question. I'm using squid to cache internet traffic to help reduce hit rates on the internet connection. I know, not really neaded but hey I have the machine to do it so why the heck not? Leaves more room for downloading other stuff.

    Anyhow, so I have a 160GB hard drive. My question is does PfSense use all of the drive or just a small amount. What I mean to say is does PfSense build a partition that partitions all of the avaliable space for usable space so that squid has lots of room to grow or is that something I need to somehow setup so that squid has lots of space to cache?

    You will have to setup squid manually and allocate the amount of space for Squid to use.  Instructions below

    http://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/Setup_Squid_as_a_Transparent_Proxy

    Sleeps


  • Netgate Administrator

    I'm fairly sure that by default you entire disk is partitioned and mounted and most of that will be available to the squid cache. However it's been a long time since I used a full HD install.
    To check you can run the command:

    df -h
    

    Either in the console or in Diagnostic:Command Prompt in the GUI. You should see something like:

    
    $ df -h
    Filesystem           Size    Used   Avail Capacity  Mounted on
    /dev/ufs/pfsense1    443M    139M    268M    34%    /
    devfs                1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /dev
    /dev/md0              38M    2.9M     33M     8%    /tmp
    /dev/md1              58M     12M     41M    23%    /var
    /dev/ufs/cf           49M    1.6M     44M     3%    /cf
    devfs                1.0K    1.0K      0B   100%    /var/dhcpd/dev
    
    

    The above is a NanoBSD install so your output will look different. Squid stores it's cache in /var so that's what you want to be big.  :)

    Steve


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