Understanding Static IP Mappings



  • I'm curious why does the Static IP Mapping allow for defining a hostname. Like say my windows computer has the name (hostname) jimbob-PC. So typically when pinging/connecting, I can just type ping jimbob-PC.

    But if I want to create a static IP mapping for my windows computer and I were to assign it a hostname other than jimbob-PC, such as myworldnow, does that mean that pinging/connecting now uses myworldnow or can I still connect via jimbob-PC??

    Say, I go to another windows computer on my LAN and want to view my computer in Network Places. How is it going to show up?

    Thanks in advance!



  • @broncoBrad:

    I'm curious why does the Static IP Mapping allow for defining a hostname. Like say my windows computer has the name (hostname) jimbob-PC. So typically when pinging/connecting, I can just type ping jimbob-PC.

    So the DNS forwarder can be given a known name for the IP address. A name can be included in a DHCP request. I presume the name in the pfSense static IP mapping overrides any name supplied in the DHCP request.

    @broncoBrad:

    But if I want to create a static IP mapping for my windows computer and I were to assign it a hostname other than jimbob-PC, such as myworldnow, does that mean that pinging/connecting now uses myworldnow or can I still connect via jimbob-PC??

    You can connect by whatever name is known to the name server you are using. If you are using DNS then the name needs to be known to DNS. If you are using Windows networking to browse shares then I believe you can use the DNS registered name(s) OR the name(s) configured in Windows networking.


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