Vhosts package on 2.1



  • I'd think that the vHosts package would need a way to supply an IPv6 address on which it's supposed to listen on. Currently that doesn't seem to be in the cards unless I'm missing something.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    No idea if anyone is even actively maintaining vhosts. I split this off into its own topic, perhaps someone else will know.





  • Well, it's possible to get a site up with both IPv4 and IPv6, with a little trick:

    create the exact same site entry twice, and use once the IPv4 IP address, and once the IPv6 IP address.

    Key, in the case of the latter, is to enclose it in square brackets, i.e. not e.g. 2001::ae but [2001::ae]

    Of course ideally this should be consistent with the rest of pfSense where one doesn't use these brackets, but for now, it works in a pinch.

    The other problem is that vhosts does TWO things, each of which by itself would not be a problem:

    a) each time you modify or add a vhost, it rewrites the configuration file in such a way that index.php has priority over index.html, index.htm and default.htm

    b) each time you modify or add a vhost, it creates an index.php file that contains this:

    	echo phpinfo();
    ?>
    
    

    So after every change/add/edit in vhosts, you have to go in and either delete this index.php file or manually edit the /var/etc/vhosts-http.conf file to reorder the default file names such that index.php is after (in my case) index.html

    Also, the vhosts don't always start up after a reboot or system upgrade, and the service monitor on the Dashboard never shows it as running, even though it is.

    Bottomline: if you know these tricks, the module is usable, but it needs some work.


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Interesting findings. That doesn't sound too hard to fix, really.



  • @rcfa:

    Well, it's possible to get a site up with both IPv4 and IPv6, with a little trick:

    create the exact same site entry twice, and use once the IPv4 IP address, and once the IPv6 IP address.

    Key, in the case of the latter, is to enclose it in square brackets, i.e. not e.g. 2001::ae but [2001::ae]

    Of course ideally this should be consistent with the rest of pfSense where one doesn't use these brackets, but for now, it works in a pinch.

    i went thru lighttpd documentation and looks like you have to add the brackets to the config. I've noticed with other server software out there, they are calling for brackets when it comes to IPv6 address. Makes sense so the port can be defined after it. I've used it in squid advance config as an example so it would listen on the IPv6 address

    http://redmine.lighttpd.net/projects/lighttpd/wiki/IPv6-Config



  • @Cino:

    i went thru lighttpd documentation and looks like you have to add the brackets to the config. I've noticed with other server software out there, they are calling for brackets when it comes to IPv6 address. Makes sense so the port can be defined after it. I've used it in squid advance config as an example so it would listen on the IPv6 address

    http://redmine.lighttpd.net/projects/lighttpd/wiki/IPv6-Config

    What an individual configuration file for a specific piece of software requires isn't of any relevance; the point of a GUI is to translate the contents of a filled in form into some sort of config file, whatever it's format might be.

    As long as not all ipv6 addresses are entered with brackets in pfsense, then none should be entered with them, so these are things that the web configurator should take care of



  • I agree with that the web GUI interface should be consistent. I was simply explaining why the brackets work.



  • @Cino:

    I agree with that the web GUI interface should be consistent. I was simply explaining why the brackets work.

    Ah, OK. Sure, same as entering an ipv6 URL in the browser…


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