Cool it is working great thanks but ….



  • Hi Steve et-el … i got it working you were right. One question though . Through the Bell gateway i was a consistent 8ms ping to Google.com. Now through the Pfsense box i am a consistent 26ms to Google.com . Is there a setting or settings i can do to lower the base ping? Thanks in advance


  • Netgate Administrator

    Glad to see you're up and running.  :)
    Hmm, an additional 18ms does seem surprisingly high.
    If you ping the bell gateway on 192.168.0.254 from a client machine do you see the full 18ms lag?
    What about if you ping the pfSense LAN interface? I would expect <1ms from a wired machine.

    Steve



  • Its back down to 8 9ms , i dont know why.

    This is the best thing ever. I switched over all the appliances and computers (only one customer in at the time) and just raped utorrent and transferred three large files back and forth and it never kicked any machines or timed out ping. I am donating. I love this thing man…..... in a bro way though.  :P



  • Trying to gauge Internet performance by ping times isn't very telling. Paths change, conditions on your ISP's network and intermediate networks change, even the location where a particular anycasted IP (Google in your case) is being routed can change. Pinging your WAN IP from internally is the only valid test of how much latency your internal network and firewall are introducing. Everything past that is factors beyond your control (with the exception of, say, traffic shaping on the firewall so you're not filling upstream buffers and can prioritize as desired).

    mtr would be a more useful measurement tool for seeing why latency to X site is what it is.


  • Netgate Administrator

    You should really try to set your modem/router device into bridge mode so that your public IP is passed to the pfSense WAN interface. With your current setup you are still reliant on the capabilities of the modem to handle your large number of connections. Doing so removes almost all the processing load on the modem so that may reduce your ping time slightly.
    I agree with what Chris said above, that ping times are often not a good measurement, however I understand that in your business low pings are highly desirable. Indeed it seems to key feature in attracting customers.

    Steve



  • @stephenw10:

    You should really try to set your modem/router device into bridge mode so that your public IP is passed to the pfSense WAN interface. With your current setup you are still reliant on the capabilities of the modem to handle your large number of connections. Doing so removes almost all the processing load on the modem so that may reduce your ping time slightly.
    I agree with what Chris said above, that ping times are often not a good measurement, however I understand that in your business low pings are highly desirable. Indeed it seems to key feature in attracting customers.

    Steve

    Although, low ping to Google is not the selling point.  Maybe keep a running ping to some popular game servers instead.  Like cmb said, a high profile web site, like google.com, is going to be a crazy moving target, but it's also not relevant to your customer's needs anyway (unless they're playing some ping sensitive game on google.com.)  It'd be like gauging traffic by looking at the local freeway reports even though your daily drive involves no freeways.

    Anyway, interestingly enough, when I ran a network gaming place I found that while network performance is important, a big part of what you're selling is the community and the game library.  While that might seem backwards considering the how people get wrapped up inside their games and seem to not want to be bothered, it's not like fast internet is the scarce commodity it once was, people have this at home.  What they may not have is a big group of people to play with (nor, more importantly, the facilities to host them) and the library of games to chose from.  A big part of what you're selling is the social aspect, I found that we did better when we catered to that.  Plus, of course, an expansive game library of games that work, part of what you're also selling is the no-hassle sampling of games.

    People may complain about a slightly higher ping time, but gamers complain, because it's never their fault that they lost the game.  Some may instinctively ping google as a knee jerk easy thing to ping and show you some kind of higher than desired ping, at which point you could ask them: "What game are you playing on google?"  That's where your ping to popular game servers comes in, but make sure to ping some local servers that you happen to get good ping times to.



  • Internal latency is >1 so thats not an issue.  :) But yes you are right, ping to google is irrelevant. I use that because when i took this place over ping to anywhere was 80 all the way into the triple digits all the time. So i just rode that metric with every change i made. Most of the issues were internal, compounded by consumer ISP slams and switching. Most of the game servers wont allow you to ping them, even if you find the address. Such ass battle.net east.

    Either way, this thing must be taking SOME of the load off. Last week the thing dropped several times in one night when it was busy. I did not when we hammered it again. I am still donating :-) Now i can move on to games and machines. And the photo printing setup :-)



  • Hmmmm there is no Bridge Mode on sagecom F@st 2864 ….. there is comments on the web stating that the only way to do this is to set the router, in this case pfSense, with all the pppoe info and set in pfSense and reset the Bell router to factory? Does that make sense?


  • Netgate Administrator

    @neteffectcafe:

    Does that make sense?

    Possibly but also could lead to no connection at all. Which would be bad!  ;)
    Do you have links to that info?

    Steve




  • Netgate Administrator

    Ah, that's interesting.

    you need to setup the WAN side of the d-link in PPPoE and use your b1 code + password in the fields.

    on Bell's network, you can use up to 3 times your b1 code at the same time.

    that will give your dlink a public IP address and work as it was the frontline worker

    So it appears that Bell will give out three public IPs. If that is the case then you just need to set your pfSense WAN interface to PPPoE and use the same login details as the Sagem router and you will get an IP. I have never encountered such a setup though.  :-\

    Steve



  • I will try that tomorrow when i expect it will be slow. Too many people coming and going right now.


  • Netgate Administrator

    Alternatively:
    http://www.broadbandreports.com/forum/r27430487-bridging-the-sagecom-bell-connection-hub-business

    Appears to be similar advise but just doesn't log in the router so that Bell only sees one login and doesn't complain.

    However if you try that you'd better be sure you know how to get back to your current set up.

    I would try the dual login option first and then only try reseting the Sagem device if you get problems.

    Steve



  • ahhh very cool i will try this Steve. I have all the login info so if it gows i can easily reconfigure the Bell router



  • see if this works



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