How to locate all system logs?



  • Hi guys!

    I was monitoring my "Status:System logs:Portal Auth" in my "Status: System logs: Settings" I put 2000 in the "Number of log entries to show:" My question is, how do I find the other past entries of my system logs? I have this situation today that I need to confirm the date of a certain voucher when it was first activated.

    Any advise is much appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Nubee



  • From a console or ssh command line:

    clog /var/log/system.log

    Look in /var/log for other logs of interest
    Grep for the things you want to look for:

    clog /var/log/system.log | grep interestingstring



  • @phil.davis:

    From a console or ssh command line:

    clog /var/log/system.logLook in /var/log for other logs of interest
    Grep for the things you want to look for:

    clog /var/log/system.log | grep interestingstring

    Very much appreciated!

    I located that file using File Manager and it seems it didn't logged any used voucher at all. Would you care to help me create a syslog server?

    Thanks!



  • In Status-System Logs-Settinngs you can direct various log message categories to a syslog server.
    Obviously you need to have a syslog server running on your network somewhere that can "eat" the log messages.



  • @phil.davis:

    In Status-System Logs-Settinngs you can direct various log message categories to a syslog server.
    Obviously you need to have a syslog server running on your network somewhere that can "eat" the log messages.

    Actually I just need to log the authentication events so that no user can bypass me or cheat me saying they haven't used their voucher where in fact they have already used it a week ago. Also, do you know where to manually edit the subnet mask? I wish to change the defauld /24 to /22 mask. Thanks!



  • If you just mean the LAN subnet, the subnet is on Interfaces->LAN page, to the right of the Static IP field.



  • @phil.davis:

    If you just mean the LAN subnet, the subnet is on Interfaces->LAN page, to the right of the Static IP field.

    I see thanks alot! You make my day!

    The reason why I wish to increase my usable IP is that, my neighborhood net connection depends on me and now they are more than a thousand connecting to me. It's not a business type but I do online charity school so I really need to increase my usable IP. I'm not really familiar with all the features of pfsense but it's worth exploring and I'm continuously amazed of what it can do.

    So increasing my IP from 250 user to max of 1022, I would changed it /22. Would that mean if I am using 192.168.20.1/25 and if I'm gona change it to /22, I'll be getting 192.168.20.1 to 192.168.21.255, is this correct?



  • When you reduce the subnet mask by 1, you cover double the addresses. But the subnets have to start on the correct sized boundary. "20" is already a multiple of 4, so it can be the start of a group of 1, 2 or 4 "class-C" subnets:
    192.168.20.1/23 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.21.255 (2 of the "class-C" subnets)
    192.168.20.1/22 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.23.255 (4 of the "class-C" subnets)

    To go bigger, the subnet will start on a multiple of 8, 16 etc:
    192.168.16.1/21 gives subnet 192.168.16.0-192.168.23.255 (8 of the "class-C" subnets)
    192.168.16.1/20 gives subnet 192.168.16.0-192.168.31.255 (16 of the "class-C" subnets)

    When you increase the subnet mask by 1 you get only half the addresses:
    192.168.20.1/25 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.21.127 (1/2 of a "class-C" subnet)
    ...



  • @phil.davis:

    When you reduce the subnet mask by 1, you cover double the addresses. But the subnets have to start on the correct sized boundary. "20" is already a multiple of 4, so it can be the start of a group of 1, 2 or 4 "class-C" subnets:
    192.168.20.1/23 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.21.255 (2 of the "class-C" subnets)
    192.168.20.1/22 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.23.255 (4 of the "class-C" subnets)

    To go bigger, the subnet will start on a multiple of 8, 16 etc:
    192.168.16.1/21 gives subnet 192.168.16.0-192.168.23.255 (8 of the "class-C" subnets)
    192.168.16.1/20 gives subnet 192.168.16.0-192.168.31.255 (16 of the "class-C" subnets)

    When you increase the subnet mask by 1 you get only half the addresses:
    192.168.20.1/25 gives subnet 192.168.20.0-192.168.21.127 (1/2 of a "class-C" subnet)
    ...

    Thanks alot phil, I realy appreciate this!


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