Installation onto CF drive



  • I'm trying to do an installation of pfSense onto a VIA Epia system, with a 256M IDE Flash drive.  I've been unable to get the standard embedded image to work, will I be safe doing a full install from the Live-CD, leaving no swap partition, and choosing the embedded kernel?



  • Hmm

    It looks like the system wont boot to the 'embedded' kernel either.  (it works fine with the normal kernel)

    If I disable packages and logging, will I achieve the same end result as using the embedded kernel (and not have the CF drive die a quick death)?



  • @naughtyusmaximus:

    Hmm

    It looks like the system wont boot to the 'embedded' kernel either.  (it works fine with the normal kernel)

    what doesn't work? Describe what you're seeing.

    @naughtyusmaximus:

    If I disable packages and logging, will I achieve the same end result as using the embedded kernel (and not have the CF drive die a quick death)?

    No, not even close to the same. There are a number of other modifications.

    Though some of the developers intentionally try to kill CF cards running full installs on them, and none of us have succeeded to date. If it's not an extremely critical system, you may want to try it anyway. You may get a couple years or more of use out of the full install on CF.



  • @naughtyusmaximus:

    Hmm

    It looks like the system wont boot to the 'embedded' kernel either.  (it works fine with the normal kernel)

    If I disable packages and logging, will I achieve the same end result as using the embedded kernel (and not have the CF drive die a quick death)?

    If you are running an embedded image the pfsense system is going to use the COM-1 port for communications - try connecting a terminal or PC running terminal emulation to COM-1 using 9600,8,1, for the settings - I suspect that is the problem.

    As for CF devices - Most of the current premium ones tend to outlast the cheap versions - the premium devices have algorythms to utilize the storage space much better than the inexpensive units - they "spread" the write operations across the whole device using virtual addressing instead of physical addressing of the storage space - that way you don't keep writing to the same memory cell locations over and over until the memory cell fails.  Of course, if you are really concerned about it you could get a micro-drive and use that instead :)

    gm…



  • The problem was that the system wouldn't get past loading the kernel - but it is moot now, since I've ordered some microdisks to use in the system instead. :)


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