Easy per IP "nice" priority settings for traffic?



  • Hey all,

    Does something like this exist?

    I have a cloud backup server that could easily gobble up all my bandwidth (which I want it to do, when everyone else is idle), and I have a VOIP box which I want to always get priority.

    I could to the complex traffic shaping thing, but it would be much easier if I could just pick IP's and give them a "nice" value like I would with CPU processes under Linux.

    Is there a way to do this?

    My options otherwise seem to be to use the rather complex traffic analyzing "traffic shaper" or to statically limit bandwidth per IP, neither of which I really want to do.



  • No, there is no point & click traffic shaping.

    Just setup a simple PRIQ shaper, which only works on priority levels and doesn't require you to do math to figure out queue bandwidth assignments, and then craft a few floating rules to shunt your LAN traffic into specific queues.



  • @KOM:

    No, there is no point & click traffic shaping.

    Just setup a simple PRIQ shaper, which only works on priority levels and doesn't require you to do math to figure out queue bandwidth assignments, and then craft a few floating rules to shunt your LAN traffic into specific queues.

    This is not a good answer. Bandwidth management on PFsense is ridiculously difficult to use or even comprehend. It really is time to implement an "easy" button here for the sake of the platforms future.



  • @router_wang:

    @KOM:

    No, there is no point & click traffic shaping.

    Just setup a simple PRIQ shaper, which only works on priority levels and doesn't require you to do math to figure out queue bandwidth assignments, and then craft a few floating rules to shunt your LAN traffic into specific queues.

    This is not a good answer. Bandwidth management on PFsense is ridiculously difficult to use or even comprehend. It really is time to implement an "easy" button here for the sake of the platforms future.

    I love that people want it just handed to them and not do any work on their own.  PFSense has support that you can pay for and they can help you with the advanced things.  You can also do a little forum searching / google searching and just playing with it on your own to see if you can get it to work.

    The biggest problem is that most people don't take the time to follow a standard process and document what they change each time.  My advice would be to:

    1. Remember PFSense is a stateful firewall and maintains the state until it is cleared so do that each time you change / test.
    2. Use the backup / restore feature for making changes and keep configs isolated.
    3. Document , document , docment what you are changing.
    4. Change one thing at a time and test.
    5. Search the forums here and other places for ideas.

    No one told me how to work with HFSC but thru banging away with it on my own and searching the forums here , I have managed to get a configuration that works for me and my situation after putting in the time to test and tune it.

    To borrow a couple of phrases - If it were easy , everyone would be doing it . And the only easy day was yesterday.



  • @sideout:

    @router_wang:

    @KOM:

    No, there is no point & click traffic shaping.

    Just setup a simple PRIQ shaper, which only works on priority levels and doesn't require you to do math to figure out queue bandwidth assignments, and then craft a few floating rules to shunt your LAN traffic into specific queues.

    This is not a good answer. Bandwidth management on PFsense is ridiculously difficult to use or even comprehend. It really is time to implement an "easy" button here for the sake of the platforms future.

    I love that people want it just handed to them and not do any work on their own.  PFSense has support that you can pay for and they can help you with the advanced things.  You can also do a little forum searching / google searching and just playing with it on your own to see if you can get it to work.

    The biggest problem is that most people don't take the time to follow a standard process and document what they change each time.  My advice would be to:

    1. Remember PFSense is a stateful firewall and maintains the state until it is cleared so do that each time you change / test.
    2. Use the backup / restore feature for making changes and keep configs isolated.
    3. Document , document , docment what you are changing.
    4. Change one thing at a time and test.
    5. Search the forums here and other places for ideas.

    No one told me how to work with HFSC but thru banging away with it on my own and searching the forums here , I have managed to get a configuration that works for me and my situation after putting in the time to test and tune it.

    To borrow a couple of phrases - If it were easy , everyone would be doing it . And the only easy day was yesterday.

    No.
    This is a project, like any other one out on the web. It will have its birth, its life, and then its  inevitable death. The only variable will be its lifespan, and the key to a longer lifespan is user mass. As long as people have the totally unrealistic attitude that bandwidth management on PFsense can be learned by the masses, then they are dooming PFsense to an early death by "Johnny come lately router".



  • AS KOM said PRIQ is pretty easy to setup and understand.  Seems like a good fit for what you want to do.  The wizard is 1 size fits some, so be aware of that.  It will get you a basic setup from which to start however.
    My advice is to make aliases for the different server/service/ip's.  That way if anything changes you don't have to muck with the fw rules, you only need to change the alias entries.