Adding External Access Point..Need to separate private & public traffic.



  • At our all of our retail stores we have pfSense firewall appliances and all locations have a ipsec tunnel to out main location.

    At our newest location we are opening we want to add a dedicated access point out in the show room.

    We want 2 SSID's one for private traffic that is on the same subnet as the LAN interface (10.0.10.0/24) so that laptops can communicate down the VPN and access network resources just like whe wired PC's on the switch. DHCP is handed out by pfSense. This is for employees.

    Then the second SSID must be completely restricted from the private traffic and on it own subnet (192.16.0.0/24) with internet access only.  This will be for customers.

    Ive been searching how to set this up but nothing I have read specifically states how to accomplish this. Most say not to use bridging of the LAN interface and to have the 2 SSID's on their own separate subnet but this will break communication down the vpn tunnel I need the employees to have on the private ssid.

    Can anyone help me out on what is the best way to accomplish this?

    Also what features should I look for in the access point besides multiple ssid?

    Thanks in advance!


  • Netgate

    VLAN tagging of SSIDs and a management VLAN.

    You will also need a managed switch to do this right without bridging pfSense interfaces.  Nothing fancy.  Something like a D-Link DGS-1100-08 will do what you need.

    For firewall rules you probably just want to add a rule on LAN rejecting connections to "OPT1 net".

    On OPT1 you'll probably want to do something like:

    Pass ICMP source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Pass TCP/UDP DNS source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Block any source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Block any source OPT1 net dest LAN net
    Block any source OPT1 net dest WAN address
    Pass any source OPT1 net dest any




  • @Derelict:

    VLAN tagging of SSIDs and a management VLAN.

    You will also need a managed switch to do this right without bridging pfSense interfaces.  Nothing fancy.  Something like a D-Link DGS-1100-08 will do what you need.

    For firewall rules you probably just want to add a rule on LAN rejecting connections to "OPT1 net".

    On OPT1 you'll probably want to do something like:

    Pass ICMP source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Pass TCP/UDP DNS source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Block any source OPT1 net dest OPT1 address
    Block any source OPT1 net dest LAN net
    Block any source OPT1 net dest WAN address
    Pass any source OPT1 net dest any

    Could I use the extra interface and by pass the switch and still accomplish this? I have a unmanaged switch in place and not have the funding for a managed switch.  I do want one vlan to be able to communicate with the lan interface to access network resources


  • Netgate

    You don't have $60 ? http://www.amazon.com/D-Link-EasySmart-Gigabit-Ethernet-DGS-1100-08/dp/B008ABLU2I/

    Bridging the pfSense interfaces will be:

    1. More complicated

    2. Exhibit inferior performance

    Yes, it can be done, but to be frank, I'm not sure I have the patience to spend a bunch of time talking you through doing it wrong so you can avoid spending $60.

    https://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/Interface_Bridges

    Here it is in a nutshell, though:

    Create VLANs 100 and 200 on eth1 (or whatever your available interface is)

    Create a bridge containing LAN and  eth1_vlan100.

    Assign interface LAN to BRIDGE0.

    Assign interface GUEST to eth1_vlan200

    Set your guest IP info and firewall rules on the GUEST interface.

    Your AP should be set to send your internal SSID tagged on VLAN 100 and your guest SSID tagged on VLAN 200.