LAN GUI not accessible!



  • pfsense is making me cry! :'(

    I have pfsense running in a virtual box as a WAN firewall and its all setup securely, although when I try to access it through my LAN settings (via a different virtual box), I am unable to access the GUI via the LAN.

    However, upon running a diagnostic, windows tells me that the server is online but cant be accessed. I've tried pinging my pfsense through my other virtual machines and the ping is not reachable even though the server is online!

    My Disable webConfigurator anti-lockout rule is disabled so by all accounts, according to the settings, it should be working.

    When this is unchecked, access to the webConfigurator on the LAN interface is always permitted, regardless of the user-defined firewall rule set. Check this box to disable this automatically added rule, so access to the webConfigurator is controlled by the user-defined firewall rules (ensure you have a firewall rule in place that allows you in, or you will lock yourself out!) Hint: the "Set interface(s) IP address" option in the console menu resets this setting as well.

    I know this is limited information but if anybody has any ideas I would greatly appreciate them as I'm about to tear my eye balls out!


  • Netgate Administrator

    You can check the firewall logs via the console to see if your requests are being blocked.

    clog /var/log/filter.log
    

    Are you able to access the webgui via the WAN though? It looks like you must be able to to check the anti-lockout rule status.

    Otherwise I'd be looking for a routing problem such as an incorrect subnet mask or a bad gateway.

    Steve



  • I'm confused as how it can be a firewall rule problem since I can access the webgui via the wan without any issues at all and as for my subnets, they are all running on 24.


  • Netgate Administrator

    There are different firewall rules for WAN and LAN. You may have blocked access to the webgui from LAN. Without seeing your rules I have no idea.

    By default anything connected to the LAN interface should be able to access the webgui so if you haven't made huge changes to the rules then it's probably not the firewall. That said by default you should not be able to access the webgui from WAN so you must have made some changes. The only exception to that is if only one interface is assigned. I'm assuming you have at least two interfaces though.

    Are running static IPs or DHCP? If it's static then are you sure the clients are actually connected to the pfSense LAN. Since you're running virtual it's an easy enough mistake to choose the wrong virtual switch.

    More info please.  ;) Screenshots are always useful.

    Steve



  • I wasnt at a location I was able to access the information to get screenshots untill now.

    From the screenshots attached you can see that Anti Lockout and GUI Redirect are disabled so it should be permitted and via any port since its allowed access to port 80.

    My LAN firewall rules include LAN –> ANY and ANY --> LAN.

    189/24 is my DHCP WAN setup and the rest are rules through a static ip virtual box system

    Confused!  :o








  • It seems strange that all your special rules, on LAN and WAN are about 192.168.1.0/24 addresses.
    What is your LAN IP/mask and WAN IP/mask?
    Maybe you are using the same (or overlapping) subnet on both LAN and WAN? That does not woork.


  • Netgate Administrator

    Your firewall rules are confusing. Do you have pfSense setup as a transparent firewall?
    You seem to have the same subnet on wan and lan.

    Edit: typed too slow. What Phil said.  ::)

    Steve



  • My WAN is 192.168.1.189 and my LAN is 192.168.1.1

    Is the issue because both the WAN and LAN ip are running from the same school of IPs?



  • Yes, every interface must use a completely separate IP subnet, e.g.
    WAN keep 192.168.1.n/24
    LAN use 192.168.2.n/24

    This problem happens a bit when you sit pfSense WAN on an existing private LAN - the existing private LAN is often already 192.168.1.n/24 and then the pfSense LAN defaults to the same subnet.


  • Netgate Administrator

    Yes. In the normal configuration, routing or NATing, the WAN and LAN must be in different subnets. The only way they can be in the same subnet is if they are bridged, a transparent firewall setup.
    With both in the same subnet the replies to your lan side clients are probably going out the wan since their IPs appear to reachable there.

    Steve

    Ah, too slow again!



  • So now I've changed the IPs too

    WAN is still 192.168.1.n/24
    LAN is now set to 192.168.2.10/24

    Changed my LAN interface IP to 192.168.2.10 within the WAN webgui and now if i ping 192.168.2.10 - I get transmit failed, general failure 100% loss


  • Netgate Administrator

    Where are you pinging from?
    Are you using DHCP?

    Steve



  • @stephenw10:

    Where are you pingjng from?
    Are you using DHCP?

    Steve

    I have Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Kali Linux and Backtrack Linux running in virtual boxes linked together with an internal adapter through my universities physical network.

    The aim is to setup pfsense so it can be run by the WAN (the physical university network) which I have done, and ALL the virtual boxes via LAN, which is what I am struggling to get working.

    So if i load any of my virtual boxes and try to ping the LAN IP address of pfsense, it either gives me request timed out or transmit failed, general failure both with all 4 packets lost and thus 100% loss.

    My WAN is running through the universities DHCP setup and the LAN is running via a static IP address



  • You will have to change the IP of all the VMs in LAN to be in 192.168.2.0/24 also - or if they are using DHCP from pfSense LAN then make sure the DHCP settings have a new range in 102.168.2.0/24 and then get each VM to release/renew its lease.


  • Netgate Administrator

    Are you confident you have the virtual box setup correct?

    Steve



  • @stephenw10:

    Are you confident you have the virtual box setup correct?

    Steve

    Yes my virtualboxes are all setup correctly, I am just about to head to where the system is based and try changing the IPs of all the virtual boxes



  • Apologies for not getting the time to respond to this until now.

    As of right now I have updated my LAN IPs so they are on a seperate subnet to the WAN and the webgui now works both via LAN and WAN which is the problem I was having.

    However, I still have no internet access within my virtual network.

    Although if i attempt to ping out from my virtual box to any system within my universities physical network it works perfectly fine, but when I try to ping into my virtualbox from the physical network I get nothing.

    So my outbound rules seem to be working, but for some reason I have nothing incoming which I am fairly sure is the reason for having no internet.

    I have no gateway setup, I've checked that WAN is my default option and I have my NAT set to automatic, although its not generating the rules for me, the table is empty


  • Netgate Administrator

    @ForensicGeek:

    I have no gateway setup, I've checked that WAN is my default option and I have my NAT set to automatic, although its not generating the rules for me, the table is empty

    You must have at least one gateway setup. When outbound NAT is set to automatic it sets rules (that don't appear in the table) to nat between internal interfaces and external interfaces but it needs to see gateways set to determine which interfaces are 'WANs'.

    Steve



  • The problem is in his reply…

    "I tried to access it via a different virtual box and couldn't"

    He doesn't understand networking yet.  Miuch less networking with VMs.

    Seems like he doesn't understand VM nets, bridged nets and why a vm running in an entirely seperate instance of virtual box cant access the lan of his virtualized pfsense.



  • @kejianshi:

    The problem is in his reply…

    "I tried to access it via a different virtual box and couldn't"

    He doesn't understand networking yet.  Miuch less networking with VMs.

    Seems like he doesn't understand VM nets, bridged nets and why a vm running in an entirely seperate instance of virtual box cant access the lan of his virtualized pfsense.

    Thanks for the extremely useful response!.

    As it happens I am well aware of how VMs, bridged nets and WANS work and that Virtual Boxs are all completely seperate from each other. I simply meant that I had tested it on multiple VMs to make sure it wasnt just something really obvious like a shell command or firewall rule I had allocated to one IP address and forgotten to allocate to another one.

    Its people like you that give these places a bad name, if ur not gonna respond with useful information, just dont bother to respond at all

    –--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    @stephennw10

    I am heading into Uni in roughly 3 hours from the time of this post, I will get screenshots of my LAN, NAT and such for you and attach them to a post



  • Sorry - Wasn't trying to insult you.  Sorry if I offended.  But you can't completely understand this and it be so difficult.
    Something very basic is missing and its nothing to do with pfsense in all likelihood.

    Its more likely a problem in the way the network cards on the VMs are being assigned and probably a basic understanding of network issues also.

    Neither should be considered the end of the world.  Took me a while to really get at all the networking of VMs.  Alot still gets by me.

    However, basically.  The pfsense VM and the client VM should have at least 1 virtual interface on the same virtual network.  Both of the VMs must be installed on the same REAL machine.

    The pfsense LAN and the Client Lan should be on the same virtual network.  The Wan of the pfsense card should be bridged.

    At that point, pfsense should be a basic install with no special rules at all and should just work.  You should see the pfsense GUI from the other VM if you are typing the correct IP.

    I apologize if I offended, but you sound a little confused and better to get to the point than to tip toe around it.

    You will be much closer to an answer this way.



  • Once you have you pfsense VM and your client VM (hopefully ubuntu or something basic) on a common virtual network for LAN and the other pfsense interface (WAN) bridged, you will have a correct basic setup.  I can pretty much guarantee the client can see the pfsense gui set up this way.

    What I can't guarantee is that whatever network you are on will grant the pfsense WAN an IP or allow its traffic.  If the network is running simple DHCP, and you have done nothing at all to the basic pfsense configuration, it will simply grab an IP and work immediately and have internet access.



  • I am fully aware that it should be as simple as:

    However, basically.  The pfsense VM and the client VM should have at least 1 virtual interface on the same virtual network.  Both of the VMs must be installed on the same REAL machine.

    The pfsense LAN and the Client Lan should be on the same virtual network.  The Wan of the pfsense card should be bridged.

    At that point, pfsense should be a basic install with no special rules at all and should just work.  You should see the pfsense GUI from the other VM if you are typing the correct IP.

    But it simply is not.

    I get that PFSense basic install should work when these details are true, but all of the information you stated above is already true and no its not that I am just clueless, although I wont claim to fully understand as I had never ever seen this software until about 3 weeks ago!

    I have installed PFSense on a personal machine at home, as has my lecturer and both our setups work by default when the network information is bridged correctly.

    However, when I attempt to do in on the University network it doesn't work so I already know its something to do with a rule that's missing or the way the network is setup.

    My issue is finding where the problem is and how to fix or bypass it, if its even possible. I don't know if its something my university has put in place as a "fix" that is more of a hindrance than a fix or if its just something obvious I have missed out

    Essentially I have PFSense installed in a virtualbox that is bridged to the universities physical network and then I have it linked via an internal network between the other 3 virtual boxes which have various different operating systems installed on them.

    My WAN setup works and my LAN setup through the internal network is also working correctly. I can access PFSense both from the physical network and from the virtual network.

    I can also ping out from my virtual network to ANY computer within the physical network, not just the host I am running the virtual boxes on but if at any point I try to ping from the physical network into my virtual network, I am not able to do so, so I already know there is a bottleneck there, the question is just where?

    My NAT is set to Automatic and I have no IPv4 Upstream as you can see from the screenshots provided, however, when you look at the gateway streams for some reason its now displaying as offline, when I checked this last time I was in the lab at uni they werent displaying as either off or online, they were just displaying as being there (if that makes any sense) so I'm guessing this is part of the problem!








  • I see no errors in you screen shots.  Don't change anything yet.
    It could be that the gateway is broken or could be that they have banned your VM's MAC or a few other problems outside pfsense or your control.
    Can you post a pic of pfsense interface > WAN page so we can see the setup?



  • Here are my WAN settings






  • Do you need IPV6?  Can you change IPV6 to "none" and leave IPV4 as it is?

    Remember to click save when you do that, assuming yo do that.

    After you do that can we see you WAN firewall rules list?



  • Wait - I do see a POTENTIAL problem on the interface > LAN.  Its given a /16.  Shouldn't it get a /24?

    Assuming you are aiming for a simple configuration.



  • @kejianshi:

    Wait - I do see a POTENTIAL problem on the interface > LAN.  Its given a /16.  Shouldn't it get a /24?

    Assuming you are aiming for a simple configuration.

    I'm thinking that /16 setting is enough to break pfsense on a WAN NETWORK of 192.168.x.x

    Previously to the issue of having no internet, I was unable to access my webgui via LAN (even with the anti lock option disabled) and apparently the reason why was because WAN and LAN cant run on the same subnet, so I had to change it?

    I have attached my wan and lan firewall rules

    189/24 is PFSense
    107/24 is the host machine on the physical network

    Any 192.168.2.x is a virtual box






  • @kejianshi:

    Wait - I do see a POTENTIAL problem on the interface > LAN.  Its given a /16.  Shouldn't it get a /24?

    Assuming you are aiming for a simple configuration.

    It is a definite problem - LAN 192.168.2.10/16 is a router sitting in the middle of the whole of 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
    Then the WAN IP that you "happen" to be given by DHCP on WAN is 192.168.1.n with gateway 192.168.1.1 - that is inside LAN, so the routing will not work properly.
    When connecting a private-address-space LAN to an upstream "WAN" that is actually another chunk of private address space, you do have to engineer it to make sure the 2 subnets do not overlap.

    Change LAN /16 to /24 and I expect it will all go.



  • A /24 includes, for example, 192.168.1.x
    A /16 includes, for example, 192.168.x.x

    So, unless I'm groggy headed today (It happens often) your LAN net is somewhat inclusive of your WAN net.  But if you changed the /16 to a /24 it shouldn't be.

    What can it hurt to change it?  If you don't like what happens, change it back.



  • I'm trying to be soft and cuddly vs. my abrasive direct self…  haha



  • Right so I've changed the subnet on my LAN back to /24 and changed my firewall rules from /16 to /24 and everything is working the same way as it was.

    I have access to the webgui via WAN and LAN, I can ping out but not in and my gateway is still apparently offline.

    Still no internet :(

    Name = WAN_DHCP
    Gateway = 192.168.1.1
    Monitor = 192.168.1.1
    RTT = 0ms
    Loss = 100%



  • Perhaps, but you are now closer to a working configuration.  Did you turn off IPV6 for now?

    And can I see your WAN firewall settings?



  • @kejianshi:

    Perhaps, but you are now closer to a working configuration.  Did you turn off IPV6 for now?

    And can I see your WAN firewall settings?

    Just incase i'm being really stupid, I've attached a picture of my network adapter IPv4 settings within my virtual machine aswell.






  • I'm sorry - I see your LAN and WAN rules.  My internet is abit slow here.

    WAN look OK (for now)
    LAN has ALOT of rules that seem to me are totally not needed and doing about nothing.

    I'd get rid of them except the 1st grey one and the last 2 default rules.

    The rest seem to not belong.

    After that, I'd reboot pfsense.



  • @kejianshi:

    I'm sorry - I see your LAN and WAN rules.  My internet is abit slow here.

    WAN look OK (for now)
    LAN has ALOT of rules that seem to me are totally not needed and doing about nothing.

    I'd get rid of them except the 1st grey one and the last 2 default rules.

    The rest seem to not belong.

    After that, I'd reboot pfsense.

    Again, same situation. Everything works apart from the internet! :(



  • Well - 1st, I would let DHCP assign the IP and DHCP for windows VM.

    But if you are going to assign it manually, put the IP of the windows machine outside the pfsense LAN DHCP range.
    Then give the windows DNS server IP the LAN address of pfsense.

    So, 192.168.2.10 for your DNS Server (Assuming you will let pfsense forward DNS, which is a smart thing to do usually)



  • @kejianshi:

    Well - 1st, I would let DHCP assign the IP and DHCP for windows VM.

    But if you are going to assign it manually, put the IP of the windows machine outside the pfsense LAN DHCP range.
    Then give the windows DNS server IP the LAN address of pfsense.

    So, 192.168.2.10 for your DNS Server (Assuming you will let pfsense forward DNS, which is a smart thing to do usually)

    You sir, are fantastic!

    All this hassle was simply because I had not allocated my secondary DNS as 192.168.2.10!

    Thank you so much for the help :D



  • I'm thinking you don't quite get what is going on yet, but you are getting closer…

    NAT comes in layers in your case and so can DHCP and DNS for that matter...

    So your 1st layer, as far as we know is the university network.  They are then assigning an IP to pfsense WAN via DHCP and DNS via DHCP (we hope)

    So pfsense then becomes your second layer of NAT and it can then assign IPs via its DHCP server and DNS to anything on its LAN...

    Or you can tackle it manually.  Your call.



  • Ohhh - Glad it works now…

    Us forum wreckers do what we can....  (-;

    Sorry if I gave you the wrong impression with my comment earlier.

    Just trying to find the core of the issue.

    Let me know if you have more issues.