Cosmetic problem ?



  • See attachment please


  • Rebel Alliance Developer Netgate

    Clear your browser cache.



  • Thank you jimp. It is really browser-related.



  • I see the same using Safari from my iPad iOS 8.1.1, refreshing fix it temporary.



  • Talking about cosmetic "problems" on gateway widgets.

    Reloading or loading the Dashboard the font-weight: of gateway IPs are in Bold after the first update font-weight: pass to normal.



  • @mais_um:

    Talking about cosmetic "problems" on gateway widgets.

    Reloading or loading the Dashboard the font-weight: of gateway IPs are in Bold after the first update font-weight: pass to normal.

    I don't think I broke that when I fixed up the Gateways Widget Status column updating last week. But anyway, good spotting. This pull request fixes it - now the bold stays after the 10 second update:
    https://github.com/pfsense/pfsense/pull/1378



  • The same cosmetic issue now seems to apply to the Interfaces widget. I just updated this morning after a little over a week, and now my Interfaces widget does the same thing that the Gateways widget used to, except only with my IPv4 addresses. Not sure if it will happen with only one address or not, since both of my interfaces have v4 and v6.



  • This should fix it: https://github.com/pfsense/pfsense/pull/1396

    There seem to have been some changes to the style of the various boxes on these widgets between 2.1 and 2.2 - so that the text inside does not default to being bold, and has to be specified as bold as it is being displayed.

    Keep looking at those widgets and finding more of these features!

    Edit, add:
    I found a bunch of things did not update in "real-time" on the Interfaces widget. This fixes everything I can find/test: https://github.com/pfsense/pfsense/pull/1397



  • FYI, the first 64bits of an IPv6 address identifies your network, you should really black out the values after the first 3 colons. You have the first 80 bits, while not enough to ping your network, it's enough to send packets to your network.

    You'll notice it starts with 2601:8:, which is shorthand for 2601:0008:. What you want to block out is Keep:Keep:Keep:block:block:block:block:block. This will be the first 48bits, which is probably just your ISP. If you asked your ISP for a larger block, and gave you a /48, then this could be your network, but most ISPs are probably going to only hand out /64, /60, /56, but I've heard of some handing out /48s on request, no questions asked.


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