Does pfsense needs a proper shutdown?



  • Just like Windows 7 that needs to properly shutdown to prevent file corruption, does pfsense needs to properly shutdown?

    I just unplug the main switch without shutting it down the pfsense :-[



  • Proper shutdowns are nice and extremely important if your install is of a type that writes to the disk.



  • With my nanobsd installation, RRD statistics are stored in memory and are written to "disk" (Compact Flash) every 24 hours. So, a power failure (your method of shutdown) would lose all the RRD stats stored in memory.

    A friend of mine wouild shutdown all his PCs by flipping off the switch a the power-strip. :(  :-\

    Always properly shutdown, if you can. It only takes a minute.


  • Banned

    @mikepogi:

    I just unplug the main switch without shutting it down the pfsense :-[
    [/quote]

    You might want to rethink your strategy…  :o

    https://redmine.pfsense.org/issues/4523



  • Anyone who things flipping the switch is a good way to shut down isn't going to know what fsck is.


  • Banned

    The weird thing is that a Windows Server shuts down faster than pfSense. It also boots quicker.

    I guess a lot could be done in that regard.



  • You gotta take good care of that drive.




  • @Supermule:

    The weird thing is that a Windows Server shuts down faster than pfSense. …...

    :o
    On running pfSense on an ancient Dell Dimension - pfSense shuts down in 6 seconds …..
    My "bleading PowerEdge Dell" Windows 2008 R2 needs 5 times more then that (iI figure that closing down 2 huge MSSQL databases needs some time).

    Btw: how do you shut down your Win server ? Ripping out the electrical plug ?  ;)

    Btw2: I'm not rebooting my pfsense that often - only when I 'f*ck' up again while pacth/coding it ;)

    Btw3: I was told (my wife …) that an Internet access is 'essential'. I made her pay an UPS ....

    @kejianshi: image => Ptdr.


  • Banned

    I use this command

    Shutdown.exe -s -t 0 -f

    It takes longer for pfSense to shutdown when running alongside each other in VM's on the same server.

    @Gertjan:

    @Supermule:

    The weird thing is that a Windows Server shuts down faster than pfSense. …...

    :o
    On running pfSense on an ancient Dell Dimension - pfSense shuts down in 6 seconds …..
    My "bleading PowerEdge Dell" Windows 2008 R2 needs 5 times more then that (iI figure that closing down 2 huge MSSQL databases needs some time).

    Btw: how do you shut down your Win server ? Ripping out the electrical plug ?  ;)

    Btw2: I'm not rebooting my pfsense that often - only when I 'f*ck' up again while pacth/coding it ;)

    Btw3: I was told (my wife …) that an Internet access is 'essential'. I made her pay an UPS ....

    @kejianshi: image => Ptdr.



  • PFSense seems to (purely a guess) gracefully shuts itself down with long timeout periods, instead of how most client-oriented OS' assume you're done and shut down almost immediately. Just like how Windows will wait FOREVER if you've got a blank notepad document open, PFSense is probably killing tasks slowly, in a methodical order to prevent problems. I can usually still access WAN for awhile after I tell PFSense to reboot, so it's probably just taking its time. My XP-era Atom box with a cheapo flashdrive for the OS boots in a minute or two, that's not outrageous by any stretch of the imagination.

    On topic: Windows is notorious for freaking out about unexpected shutdowns, even when there is no apparent data loss. That being said, if there was an update running in the background, you may be greeted by a bluescreen. Embedded versions of PFSense are less likely to be upset by power loss, but it's such a PITA to troubleshoot a headless PC that won't boot fully. A UPS is probably overkill for most, but deliberately cutting power to your server is like getting bagels out of the toaster with a fork. It's just a bad idea, plain an simple.



  • deliberately cutting power to your server is like getting bagels out of the toaster with a fork

    Before using a fork in the toaster, I always cut the power to the toaster - usually without doing a clean shutdown  :P



  • @phil.davis:

    deliberately cutting power to your server is like getting bagels out of the toaster with a fork

    Before using a fork in the toaster, I always cut the power to the toaster - usually without doing a clean shutdown  :P

    You have one of those NetBSD powered toasters?


  • Banned

    Doesnt everyone??

    @Nullity:

    @phil.davis:

    deliberately cutting power to your server is like getting bagels out of the toaster with a fork

    Before using a fork in the toaster, I always cut the power to the toaster - usually without doing a clean shutdown  :P

    You have one of those NetBSD powered toasters?



  • The BSD Toaster ?
    It has been forked ?

    :o




  • @Gertjan:

    The BSD Toaster ?
    It has been forked ?

    :o

    lol, well played sir, well played…



  • @doktornotor:

    @mikepogi:

    I just unplug the main switch without shutting it down the pfsense :-[
    [/quote]

    You might want to rethink your strategy…  :o

    https://redmine.pfsense.org/issues/4523

    Yanking the power plug does not cause a kernel panic. That's specific to kernel panics only, not unclean shut downs.

    With nanobsd versions, you definitely want to cleanly shut down/reboot so it saves your RRD data, etc. With full installs, it doesn't really matter. I very rarely do a normal shut down of any dev or test system and can't recall ever breaking anything from doing so.

    That said, I would never just yank the plug out of any important production system running any OS if it's avoidable. There is always a possibility, though extremely remote, that Windows, Linux, BSD, etc. will end up with some kind of not easily repairable issues if you happened to pull the plug at exactly the wrong time. Certain use cases are much more likely than others to suffer such problems (like Windows servers with Exchange or SQL, *nix systems with busy MySQL, Postgres, similar servers).


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