Pcie v1 SX/LX 10/100/1000 SFP card



  • Need suggestions regarding the above mentioned SFP card please. Intel NIC would be prefered if possible.



  • We've used some from this company at my place of work:
    http://www.lr-link.com/DesktopFiberNICCards/GigabitPCI-EFiberNICs/index1.shtml

    From what I see, they last about 4 years before dying.



  • @wiretap:

    We've used some from this company at my place of work:
    http://www.lr-link.com/DesktopFiberNICCards/GigabitPCI-EFiberNICs/index1.shtml

    From what I see, they last about 4 years before dying.

    Thanks for the link :)



  • @wiretap:

    We've used some from this company at my place of work:
    http://www.lr-link.com/DesktopFiberNICCards/GigabitPCI-EFiberNICs/index1.shtml

    From what I see, they last about 4 years before dying.

    are theere no sfp cards that support 10/100/1000 speeds? or are they fixed at one speed only?



  • They usually support 100BASE-T as well, but I don't ever recommend setting things to auto-negotiate. In your network it is best to have each link setup with full duplex, half duplex, etc, depending on what devices you are connected to. I've run into many problems where certain NICs will barf and spam the network, causing switches and routers to crawl to their knees, and even make CPU's go to 100% usage when using auto negotiate. Figure out your network architecture you want and manually set the speed you need. Just recently a vendor sent us a PLC with auto negotiate turned on to a fiber connection, and it caused half our DCS (distributed control system) network to drop out.



  • @wiretap:

    They usually support 100BASE-T as well, but I don't ever recommend setting things to auto-negotiate. In your network it is best to have each link setup with full duplex, half duplex, etc, depending on what devices you are connected to. I've run into many problems where certain NICs will barf and spam the network, causing switches and routers to crawl to their knees, and even make CPU's go to 100% usage when using auto negotiate. Figure out your network architecture you want and manually set the speed you need. Just recently a vendor sent us a PLC with auto negotiate turned on to a fiber connection, and it caused half our DCS (distributed control system) network to drop out.

    if you got horrible NICs that don't do autoneg correctly, then for fuck sake ; change the NICs. If you got a bad PLC, then return it to the vendor (or just the ethernet module)
    setting speeds manually is allways going to be trouble in the long run. specially if there are employee changes in the company.

    i know of company's that had to pay tons of $$ because someone thought it was a good idea to fuck things up by disabling autoneg on random devices on the network.
    this wasn't an issue till they replaced their 10/100 switches by new ones and all hell broke loose.



  • @heper:

    if you got horrible NICs that don't do autoneg correctly, then for fuck sake ; change the NICs. If you got a bad PLC, then return it to the vendor (or just the ethernet module)
    setting speeds manually is allways going to be trouble in the long run. specially if there are employee changes in the company.

    i know of company's that had to pay tons of $$ because someone thought it was a good idea to fuck things up by disabling autoneg on random devices on the network.

    Yes, this. It's never a good idea to disable autonegotiation unless your provider forces you to because they're stuck in the '90s, or in very rare cases where you have a broken device that can't reasonably be fixed otherwise. I've yet to see an environment in this century that disabled autonegotiation as a standard do anything but cause themselves tons of problems they wouldn't have otherwise had.



  • This is in the nuclear industry with Q1 certified products, Intel NICs only, and Cisco networking hardware where the uptime has to be year-round (usually 5 years) with no shutdowns/reboots until the devices are replaced on a preventative maintenance schedule. We never use auto-negotiate. Also, we are limited to what brands we can use, and an engineering design package to approve other types of hardware would be in the tens of millions of dollars to overhaul the entire network.



  • so auto negotation is important, i get that. now can you guys please suggest an SFP card please supporting 10/100/1000 speeds?







  • wikipedia:

    PCI Express 2.0[edit]

    A PCI Express 2.0 expansion card that provides USB 3.0 connectivity
    PCI-SIG announced the availability of the PCI Express Base 2.0 specification on 15 January 2007.[26] The PCIe 2.0 standard doubles the transfer rate compared with PCIe 1.0 to 5 GT/s and the per-lane throughput rises from 250 MB/s to 500 MB/s. This means a 32-lane PCIe connector (×32) can support throughput up to 16 GB/s aggregate.

    PCIe 2.0 motherboard slots are fully backward compatible with PCIe v1.x cards. PCIe 2.0 cards are also generally backward compatible with PCIe 1.x motherboards, using the available bandwidth of PCI Express 1.1. Overall, graphic cards or motherboards designed for v2.0 will work with the other being v1.1 or v1.0a.

    The PCI-SIG also said that PCIe 2.0 features improvements to the point-to-point data transfer protocol and its software architecture.[27]

    Intel's first PCIe 2.0 capable chipset was the X38 and boards began to ship from various vendors (Abit, Asus, Gigabyte) as of October 21, 2007.[28] AMD started supporting PCIe 2.0 with its AMD 700 chipset series and nVidia started with the MCP72.[29] All of Intel's prior chipsets, including the Intel P35 chipset, supported PCIe 1.1 or 1.0a.[30]

    Like 1.x, PCIe 2.0 uses an 8b/10b encoding scheme, therefore delivering, per-lane, an effective 4 Gbit/s max transfer rate from its 5 GT/s raw data rate.
    –------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    PCI Express 2.1[edit]
    PCI Express 2.1 (with its specification dated March 4, 2009) supports a large proportion of the management, support, and troubleshooting systems planned for full implementation in PCI Express 3.0. However, the speed is the same as PCI Express 2.0. Unfortunately, the increase in power from the slot breaks backward compatibility between PCI Express 2.1 cards and some older motherboards with 1.0/1.0a, but most motherboards with PCI Express 1.1 connectors are provided with a BIOS update by their manufacturers through utilities to support backward compatibility of cards with PCIe 2.1.



  • @heper:

    wikipedia:

    PCI Express 2.0[edit]

    A PCI Express 2.0 expansion card that provides USB 3.0 connectivity
    PCI-SIG announced the availability of the PCI Express Base 2.0 specification on 15 January 2007.[26] The PCIe 2.0 standard doubles the transfer rate compared with PCIe 1.0 to 5 GT/s and the per-lane throughput rises from 250 MB/s to 500 MB/s. This means a 32-lane PCIe connector (×32) can support throughput up to 16 GB/s aggregate.

    PCIe 2.0 motherboard slots are fully backward compatible with PCIe v1.x cards. PCIe 2.0 cards are also generally backward compatible with PCIe 1.x motherboards, using the available bandwidth of PCI Express 1.1. Overall, graphic cards or motherboards designed for v2.0 will work with the other being v1.1 or v1.0a.

    The PCI-SIG also said that PCIe 2.0 features improvements to the point-to-point data transfer protocol and its software architecture.[27]

    Intel's first PCIe 2.0 capable chipset was the X38 and boards began to ship from various vendors (Abit, Asus, Gigabyte) as of October 21, 2007.[28] AMD started supporting PCIe 2.0 with its AMD 700 chipset series and nVidia started with the MCP72.[29] All of Intel's prior chipsets, including the Intel P35 chipset, supported PCIe 1.1 or 1.0a.[30]

    Like 1.x, PCIe 2.0 uses an 8b/10b encoding scheme, therefore delivering, per-lane, an effective 4 Gbit/s max transfer rate from its 5 GT/s raw data rate.
    –------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    PCI Express 2.1[edit]
    PCI Express 2.1 (with its specification dated March 4, 2009) supports a large proportion of the management, support, and troubleshooting systems planned for full implementation in PCI Express 3.0. However, the speed is the same as PCI Express 2.0. Unfortunately, the increase in power from the slot breaks backward compatibility between PCI Express 2.1 cards and some older motherboards with 1.0/1.0a, but most motherboards with PCI Express 1.1 connectors are provided with a BIOS update by their manufacturers through utilities to support backward compatibility of cards with PCIe 2.1.

    my bad, thanks for educating :)


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