Cox Residential is all live


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    http://www.cox.com/residential/support/internet/article.cox?articleId=0bced860-9666-11df-6baf-000000000000

    All residential Cox customers in all markets now have access to IPv6, with the exception of the following.

    • Only Cable Modems and Voice Modems are currently enabled to pass IPv6 traffic.

    • WiFi Modems will be enabled for IPv6 during Q2 2016. 3. G1GABLAST and Cox Business customers will have IPv6 enabled at a later date with a target of 2016.

    • Remaining markets are scheduled to launch in 2016.

    Honored my /56 prefix hint. Now we'll see if it ever changes.



  • Wow… a /56... Comcast only gives residential customers as small as a /60... Business can get a /56 though (but not static, at least not yet).

    Not that I have a need for 256 /64 networks (I don't even need all of the 16 that I get with a /60)... but wow. :)



  • @virgiliomi:

    Wow… a /56... Comcast only gives residential customers as small as a /60... Business can get a /56 though (but not static, at least not yet).

    Not that I have a need for 256 /64 networks (I don't even need all of the 16 that I get with a /60)... but wow. :)

    Yes, and it appears to be working really well with pfSense (2.2.6). A /56 is a bit overkill, but seems reasonable in the whole IPv6 scheme of things.

    My only complaint is the COX DNS servers are slow handling IPv6 lookups. The solution is to just use Google or OpenDNS servers.


  • LAYER 8 Netgate

    Or just use the resolver.

    It's not that I need 256 /64s here at the house but I can easily see myself needing more than 16. The whole point of IPv6 is to never worry about it again. There are enough /56 networks to give every person on earth 10.1 million of them (in general, not counting reserved space etc (2^56 / population of earth @ wolframalpha)). It's a non-issue. Just get a /56.


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