Simple Routing Question



  • Hi

    assuming I've got the networks:

    • 10.10.1.0/24, called Network A
    • 10.10.2.0/24, called Network B

    For all the osts in Network A the default gateway is 10.10.0.1. I set a route on that gateway to Network B: 10.10.0.2 (which is the firewall protecting Network B's interface in the Network A).

    Assuming I've got a client in Network A, let it have 10.10.0.120. I set that client a default route of 10.10.0.1, as that's where it can connect to the Internet. When this client want's access to Network B, the packet goes first to the default Gateway, which will forward that packet to 10.10.0.2 (as that's the route for Network B). So, that works. Only thing is: There's some kind of an overhead, as it would be more direct if the Client already new about that route himself, so the packet would not have to go through 10.10.0.1 first.

    So what's best practice in this case? Entering static routes to Network B in all the clients/servers in Network A is annoying in my opinion. So,…does the scenario described above have any impact regarding performance?oO

    Regards
    Rafael


  • Banned

    It just works out of the box. No idea what you are trying to invent.



  • Well, if GW 10.10.0.1 didn't have a routing table entry as where to find GW to 10.10.2.0, how should a client from within network A connect to network B? Not at all…so it doesn't "just work",...


  • Banned

    Via the default gateway. Duh. So yeah, it "just works" until you start inventing "problems" and "fixes".



  • But only if the default gateway has the routing table entry for Network B?


  • Banned

    It has a routing entry for any network configured on one of its interfaces. For the rest, you configure the route there manually ONCE, instead of configuring it on those zillions clients on the LAN. Sigh.



  • Yes, very nice. That's what I've done. The initial question more like: Does that extra hop (through default gateway instead directly to the gateway for Network B) has any implications…? That's all I wanted to know ;-)


  • Banned

    Yeah. The implication is that it's one "extra" hop. When you do not want one "extra" hop, then stop putting those computers on separate subnets.



  • Yes thanks, I already know that there's an extra hop. And no, I won't, as they HAVE TO BE on different networks,…


  • Banned


  • LAYER 8 Global Moderator

    Dude draw up this question

    You state

    • 10.10.1.0/24, called Network A

    Then you state
    For all the osts in Network A the default gateway is 10.10.0.1 – How and the F does that work??

    Then
    I set a route on that gateway to Network B: 10.10.0.2 (which is the firewall protecting Network B's interface in the Network A)

    Where are you setting this??  So have down stream networks?  If you host route your more than likely going to have asymmetric routing..  If you have these networks both connected to pfsense - how do you think you would get to the other network without routing through that networks gateway?

    If you trying to cut out a hop by create host routes this is problems waiting to happen!!  And extra working making sure hosts have routes..

    If you have an actual valid question - please draw up what your asking about and happy to discuss with you why asymmetrical routing is BAD idea…  If you have downstream networks, ie another router/firewall in your network with networks behind you need to get to the best solution is a transit network.

    As to why so many replies dok - is you keep posting ;)


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